The Catholic University of America

Course Descriptions

Theology and Religious Studies (TRS)

To view the complete schedule of courses for
each semester, go to Cardinal Station.

TRS 120: Discovering Jerusalem

1.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 158: International Mission Experience

3.00 Credits

Ten-week course culminating in a twenty-one-day service learning experience. Presents students with the opportunity to address issues of poverty and social justice within academic and real-world settings. Addresses the historical, political, social, economic and religious issues facing those living in Central America. Invites students to live out Jesus' call to service through living with and working for the poor of rural areas in third world countries. Each student will be expected to raise funds to cover trip costs. Application and approval through campus ministry required. Note: This course does not satisfy a TRS distribution requirement and is taken as a free elective.

TRS 200: Introduction to the Old Testament

3.00 Credits

An introduction to the books and theologies of the Old Testament including methods for interpreting Scripture in light of the Second Vatican Council's Decree on Divine Revelation.

TRS 201: Faith Seeking Understanding

3.00 Credits

An introductory course in theology that provides a glimpse into the science of the study of God through the exploration of the thought of selected theologians and scripture. Students will learn how to read and interpret various genres of theological texts from different historical eras'including the Old Testament, the New Testament, the early Church, the Middle Ages, the Reformation era, the period of the Second Vatican Council, and the present time. By engaging these texts through discussion, research, and writing, students will gain an introductory grasp of the academic discipline of theology.

TRS 201H: Faith Seeking Understanding

3.00 Credits

Honors Sections of the TRS 201 Introductory Theology course.

TRS 205: Jerusalem in History and Tradition

3.00 Credits

TRS 205 (crosslisted as HSLS 205) "Jerusalem in History and Tradition. This course, which counts in the Honors Liberal Studies Track and as a substitute in the Humanities Track, explores the history of Jerusalem from its founding to the present as well as the traditions that adhere to it and its mythic dimensions. The focus is on the overlap and interplay of the ancient, the theological, and the political. Seminar format. Open to Honors students only.

TRS 210: Introduction to the New Testament

3.00 Credits

Study of the writings of the New Testament with special focus on the Four Gospels, The Acts of the Apostles, and the Pauline letters. Will cover the history and methods for interpreting the New Testament, especially in light of the Second Vatican Council's Decree on Divine Revelation.

TRS 220: Church Through the Ages: Paul to Luther

3.00 Credits

This course will examine the history of Christianity from the Apostolic Age to the beginning of the Protestant Reformation. Seven major themes will be considered: Christian identity in the Roman world; the emergence of orthodoxy and heresy; conciliar debate and the flowering of monasticism; spiritual reflection in the late antique West; the making of Christian Europe; the reforming spirit; and the Christian intellectual life.

TRS 221: Church Through the Ages:Trent to Vatican II

3.00 Credits

The Council of Trent (1545-1562) was convened by the Church to respond to the challenge of the Protestant Reforms. In many ways it defined a Catholic identity that was to endure to the 20th century. The course will study in its historical context the major aspects of "tridentine Catholicism": hierarchical structure, Roman centralization, definite faith, missionary zeal. It will consider the men and women who influenced this movement, their faith, their spirituality; as well as the ways in which such as identity as been challenged in the modern era, culminating with the changes introduced by the Second Vatican Council.

TRS 230: Introduction to Moral Theology/Ethics

3.00 Credits

A general introduction to ethics in the Christian tradition. Will consider ethical decision-making, moral development, and the place of community and Church in the moral life. Examines traditional sources for Christian ethics - Scripture, theological texts, and Church teachings - as well as the current work in the social sciences.

TRS 240: Christian Liturgy Prayer Sacrament

3.00 Credits

Introduction to the fundamentals of Christian Liturgy, including the meaning of assembly, ritual, symbol and gesture, proclamation of scripture and blessing prayers as central to liturgical celebration, and the relationship of liturgy to life.

TRS 251: The Dynamics of Christian Spirituality

3.00 Credits

Critically examines themes in Christian spirituality. Special attention will be given to love as it pertains to various human practices, experiences, and ideals, including friendship, family, sexuality, liturgy, and mystical experiences. Includes studies of classic texts.

TRS 261: Enduring Questions in Catholic Theology

3.00 Credits

An analysis of current questions on topics such as God, evolution, evil, revelation, Christ, Church, and sacrament. Examines Scripture, Tradition, and Magisterial teaching in an effort to engage the modern Catholic with classical answers to age-old questions.

TRS 280: The Religious Quest

3.00 Credits

This course will introduce students to the basic questions that underlie all religions and the quest for human meaning. It will then examine the methods by which one can come to understand a religion or set of practices that are not one's own. The contributions of the social sciences, and the theological issues raised by studying non-Christian traditions will be covered.

TRS 290: World Religions

3.00 Credits

This course is an introduction to several major religious traditions: Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Judaism, and Islam. We will approach these religions through their historical development, their major doctrinal and philosophical patterns, and their practices. Although the primary class format will be lecture, the instructor encourages all students to ask questions and engage in discussion freely.

TRS 291: Introduction to Christianity

3.00 Credits

An introduction to Christian beliefs and practices for students with little or no familiarity with Christian faith or Catholicism. Topics covered may include: Christian scriptures, the life and teaching of Jesus, the emergence of the early Church, basic Christian teachings, sacraments, and liturgies. Elements that distinguish the Roman Catholic tradition from other Christian denominations will be explained.

TRS 300: Narrative in the Old Testament

3.00 Credits

Narrative literature in general, its aims and procedures; Old Testament narrative tradition, overview and detailed analysis of selected narratives from historical, didactic, mythic, and apocalyptic traditions.

TRS 300A: The Old Testament and Film

3.00 Credits

This course is designed to assist the student in recognizing and understanding the use of the Old Testament in film, for through this medium religion and culture intersect. By the end of the course, students will not merely have an increased awareness of the abundance of Biblical themes and references used in movies, but will see how films engage in interpretative expression, never merely "re-creating" the story but always "re-interpreting."

TRS 301: Introduction to Biblical Archelogy

3.00 Credits

This course will discuss the insights into the world and material culture of the Old Testament that were gained during the past century. It will give an overview of the archaeology of ancient Israel, focus on new trends in recent research, and reflect on the relationship of the archaeological data and the Old Testament.

TRS 302: Women in the Bible

3.00 Credits

This course will examine the biblical women of Genesis, Judges, and Samuel, as well as the New Testament, using close readings of the biblical text as informed by intertestamental writings, early Church interpretations, and rabbinic midrash, as well as contemporary literary and analytic perspectives.

TRS 303: Creation in the Old Testament

3.00 Credits

This course examines how peoples of the Ancient Near East explained the origins of the world. This is done by reading primary texts from Egypt, Mesopotamia, and Canaan alongside Genesis 1-3 and allusions to creation in Job, Psalms, Isaiah, etc. It focuses on interpreting the light that non-biblical texts shed on the Bible, science vs. "creationism" issues, and the theological meaning of the biblical creation texts read in dialogue with modern interpreters from Dietrich Bonhoeffer to Benedict XVI.

TRS 304: The Psalms

3.00 Credits

A detailed study of the book of Psalms, including its interpretation in Jewish and Christian traditions and its use in worship and liturgy. The Psalms as a summary of the Bible and a school of prayer.

TRS 305: Justice and the Old Testament

3.00 Credits

This course is a study of social justice and Old Testament ethics, in particular the social vision of the prophets and legal traditions of the Bible and their application to contemporary issues. It offers an in-depth examination of the prophets' exhortations and teachings on God's justice for Israel. Particular attention will also be given to the Exodus as a paradigm for liberation. The course will regularly examine the use of the biblical social justice message for the life and work of the modern Church and provide an opportunity to discuss the significance of the prophetic cry for justice for the Church today.

TRS 306: War and Violence in the Old Testament

3.00 Credits

An examination of biblical passages involving war and interpersonal violence. Includes a study of the moral critique of Scripture, how interpreters have responded to this critique, and the wider analogous issue of violence in the media.

TRS 307: Prophecy in Israel

3.00 Credits

The course will begin with a general orientation to prophets and prophecy in the Bible. It will then focus on selected biblical prophets, looking at them in their chronological order.

TRS 308: Theology of the Old Testament

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 310: The Gospels of Matthew, Mark & Luke

3.00 Credits

An introduction to the synoptic gospels, Matthew, Mark, and Luke; their origins and significance in the apostolic church. Includes an investigation of contemporary methods of New Testament interpretation: historical-critical and theological-ecclesial.

TRS 311: The Gospel of John

3.00 Credits

The structure of John: the Book of Signs, the Book of Glory. Jesus as incarnate Logos; Jesus as the source of Christian life. Religious symbol in John.

TRS 312: The Letters of Paul

3.00 Credits

After a discussion of Paul's life and ministry as narrated in the Acts of the Apostles, this course provides a close reading of several Pauline letters in light of the religious message they communicate. The course gives special attention to Paul's understanding Christ, sin and redemption, the Church, the moral life and hope of the believer.

TRS 313: Book of Revelation

3.00 Credits

This course will examine the genre, historical origins and theological vision of the Book of Revelation (the Apocalypse of John), through a close reading of the text. Attention will also be paid to Revelation's ambiguous position in the life of the Church across the centuries, and its wider cultural impact.

TRS 315: Narrative in the Synoptic Gospels

3.00 Credits

The use of literary technique in the Synoptic Gospels. The importance for theological emphasis of structure, identification, gapping, and reader response.

TRS 316: Suffering in the Bible

3.00 Credits

This course will examine the presentation of suffering and trauma in several biblical texts including the causes of suffering and responses to it. It will also consider how some of these texts (such as those found in Job, Isaiah, the crucifixion narratives and the letters of Paul) have been understood in later Jewish and Christian traditions.

TRS 320: Reformation 1500-1648

3.00 Credits

An examination of the political, socioeconomic, intellectual, and religious backgrounds and the careers and teachings of the magisterial and radical reformers, both on the continent and in England.

TRS 320A: Reform, Reformation, Renewal: 1500 - 1610

3.00 Credits

A study of ongoing reform in the Church from the healing of the Western Schism to the organized Roman response to the Protestant Reformation.

TRS 321A: The Church in Africa

3.00 Credits

An analysis of the history and practices of the Catholic Church in Africa, with a particular focus on East Africa, the spiritual epicenter of Catholicism on that continent. The course will examine both the gifts and the challenges of African Catholicism.

TRS 322: Christian Beginnings

3.00 Credits

Christian Beginnings focuses on the first centuries during which Christianity takes its shape as an organized religion. It is a survey of the social and cultural history, and the life and organization of the early Church. It focuses on the beginnings of Christianity in various parts of the world.

TRS 324: Saints and Sinners: A History of the Popes

3.00 Credits

An exploration of the life of the Catholic Church from the perspective of the Papacy. The course will make a critical use of the TV series Saints and Sinners, and of the book written in conjunction by Eamon Duffy (Yale University Press, 1997).

TRS 324A: Women in the Christian Tradition

3.00 Credits

An examination of the roles of women as well as the ways in which women have been portrayed throughout the Christian tradition, with attention to various geographical regions and across historical eras.

TRS 325: American Catholicism Since 1945

3.00 Credits

An interdisciplinary approach to thematic issues in the American Catholic experience. Topics include Catholic ethnicity, devotional piety, assimilation, interest group conflict, and social movements, along with other social, cultural, and historical dynamics that have shaped Catholic identity in the United States.

TRS 327: American Catholic History: Catholic Identities 1800-1970

3.00 Credits

With an emphasis upon religious thought, devotionalism, spirituality, ethnicity and public Catholicism, this course focuses on the formation of identities. Woven into the themes of this course are the various meanings of what constitutes being American and Catholic from the preimmigrant Church to the post-Vatican II era.

TRS 328: Makers of Hispanic Catholic History

3.00 Credits

The historical origins of contemporary Hispanic/Latino Catholicism seen through representative "history makers": (1) La Reconquista and the Age of Discovery (Isabel and Fernando, Catherine of Aragón, Ignatius of Loyola, Teresa of Avila); (2) La Conquista and Christianization (Bartolomé de las Casas, Sor Juana de la Cruz, Junípero Serra); (3) Independence and Immigration (Hidalgo, Varela); (4) Twentieth Century (Pro, Romero, Chávez, Elizondo).

TRS 329: Devotionalism in U.S. Catholicism, 1850-1970

3.00 Credits

With an emphasis on immigration, ethnicity, gender, and race, this course focuses on the devotionalism and spirituality of Catholic people in parishes and beyond, from the earliest immigration prior to the civil war to the profound changes in styles of prayer and liturgy in the 1950s and 60s.

TRS 330: The Church and Social Issues

3.00 Credits

A review of the social teaching of the Church introduces a discussion of the grounds and limits of the Church's intervention in social and political issues. Specific problems focus the discussion.

TRS 332: Contemporary Moral Issues & the Catholic Tradition

3.00 Credits

Examines moral problems such as racism, economic and social justice, abortion, and sexual ethics, in the light of contemporary culture and the Christian tradition. Focus on practical moral issues, as well as the challenge to moral life posed by contemporary assumptions of ethical relativism. This course includes a service learning component.

TRS 333: Biomedical and Health Care Ethics for Nursing

3.00 Credits

A Examines biomedical and health care ethics in a Catholic theological perspective. Select beginning of life and end of life issues and such issues as the identity of Catholic health care facilities, healthcare laws, and the ethics of research are considered in light of fundamental Christian convictions regarding the dignity of the human person, health and sickness, suffering, death, the purpose of medicine, and the practices of healthcare providers. Designed for nursing students and in light of the mission of the School of Nursing, it aims to provide students with opportunities to explore the impact of ethical issues on their personal and professional lives. Emphasis is placed on developing written and spoken skills in reflective moral thinking. Enrollment to Nursing students and when possible, pre-med students; departmental approval required.

TRS 333A: Biomedical and Health Care Ethics

3.00 Credits

Examines biomedical and health care ethics in a Catholic theological perspective. Select beginning of life and end of life issues and such issues as the identity of Catholic health care facilities, healthcare laws, and the ethics of research are considered in light of fundamental Christian convictions regarding the dignity of the human person, health and sickness, suffering, death, the purpose of medicine, and the practices of healthcare providers. Emphasis is placed on developing written and spoken skills in reflective moral thinking.

TRS 334: War, Peace & Revolution: Christian Perspectives

3.00 Credits

Examines historical and contemporary perspectives on war, peace, and revolution in the Christian tradition, especially Roman Catholicism. Historical issues include biblical perspective on violence and nonviolence and the emergence and development of conceptions of just war in Christianity and Islam. Contemporary issues include terrorism, humanitarian intervention, and religious peacemaking. Required of students minoring in Peace and Justice Studies.

TRS 335: Christian Marriage and Family Life

3.00 Credits

This course will explore marriage and family themes from the perspective of Christian church history, theology , and the current state of family life in the North American context. Attention will also be given the practices and skills necessary to build a healthy marriage and family. (Formerly TRS 352.)

TRS 337B: History of Christian Political Thought

3.00 Credits

An introduction to a body of classic material dealing with the relationship of the Christian to the political authority (i.e., the state). St. Augustine, St. Thomas, Luther, Calvin and the Radical Reformation answers to the difficult question of how a Christian lives in society will be explored. Sections of the class will be topical, focusing on issues like participation in war, law and public discourse, and punishment.

TRS 338: War Ethics and Film

3.00 Credits

A exploration of the folowing questions surrounding the nexus of war, film, and morality. How do films convey ethical messages regarding their subjects? How do they convey religious meanings? How is moral judgment relevant to warfare? How has the development of modern warfare been bound up with visual media? What possibilities for moral commentary on war are afforded by different film genres such as documentaries, dramas, and comedies? Is it appropriate to make ethical assessments of artistic products such as films? Are there limits to the power of film to express the moral reality of combat or suffering? What commentary does the public reception of individual films provide on the ethical climate of a society?

TRS 340: Christian Celebration: The Mass

3.00 Credits

Considers the meaning of the Mass in the lives of Christians today. Studies the origin and history of the Mass, the revised rites, and contemporary practice.

TRS 341: Sickness, Death and Christian Ritual

3.00 Credits

A liturgical theological study of "Pastoral Care of the Sick: Rites of Anointing and Viaticum" and the "Order of Christian Funerals" as well as an exploration of customs such as pilgrimage to shrines associated with healing and ritual practices accompanying death.

TRS 342: The Sacraments of Initiation

3.00 Credits

A historical theological study of the present Rites of Initiation, particularly the Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults. Selected pastoral questions connected with initiation will also be considered.

TRS 343: Christian Feasts and Devotions

3.00 Credits

An exploration of the origin, development, and significance of feasts, seasons, and devotions in the life of the Christian community. Sunday observances, Easter and Lent, Christmas and Advent, devotion to the saints, Marian devotions, and Eucharistic devotions.

TRS 344: Spiritualities and Liturgies of the Eastern Churches

3.00 Credits

This course consists of two parts. The first will be an introductory study of the Divine Liturgies of the various Eastern Church traditions. A comparison will be made of the various texts, and the theology of each tradition will be examined. The second part of the course will present an introduction into the spiritual traditions of the Syriac speaking and Byzantine Churches. It will study the writings of the major figures of each tradition with the view of developing the common themes that characterize the spirituality of the Eastern Churches. It will also provide the theological world-view out of which these spiritual writers developed their insights.

TRS 345: Liturgical Art and Architecture

3.00 Credits

An exploration of the theology expressed in Christian liturgical art, architecture and worship space. Using a historical approach, the diverse forms, contexts and worldviews that shaped ritual, visual objects and worship space will be investigated from the early church to the present, each with the purpose of understanding the underlying theology of the worshiping community's understanding of the sacred, their relationship to God and their relationship to each other. Course will incorporate local churches (either Washington DC metropolitan area or Rome) in the study of the ways that human beings construct meaning in liturgical art, architecture and worship space as well as how images and spaces are a theological reflection of the faith tradition.

TRS 351: Contemporary Christian Spirituality

3.00 Credits

Survey of some significant Christian spiritual writers and movements of the twentieth century, addressing such issues as modern monasticism, inter-religious dialogue, martyrdom, service to the poor, lay spirituality, a spirituality of work, and Pentecostalism.

TRS 353: Religion and the Life Cycle

3.00 Credits

An examination of the foundations for religion in life experience and of the place and development of religion in the life span. Religion and adulthood. Religion and life crises.

TRS 354: Religious Experience: Psychological and Theological Perspectives

3.00 Credits

Classic and contemporary interpretation of religious experience. Psychological and theological criteria for discerning authentic religious experience.

TRS 355: The Mission of the Contemporary Catholic

3.00 Credits

The Second Vatican Council states that it is the mission of the laity to witness, evangelize and sanctify the world. This course will consider how today's Catholics fulfill this mission as they live and practice the faith witnessed for two millennia. We will look at scripture, baptism, spirituality, the theological tradition, the lives of lay saints, the teachings of Vatican II and the post-conciliar Church, and the cultural context of the American Church to identify and understand this mission.

TRS 356: Francis of Assisi: Prophet of Peace and of Creation

3.00 Credits

In the pursuit of peace and the preservation of the environment, Francis of Assisi is universally proposed as a patron, intercessor, and model. In addition to examining the life of Francis and the struggles of his times, this course will examine in depth the portrait of Francis written by St. Bonaventure, who understood Francis to be a model of every Christian called to be an instrument of peace and a catalyst in respecting creation.

TRS 356A: Francis and Clare

3.00 Credits

Examines the life and writings of Francis and Clare of Assisi in order to understand their theological vision and its consequences for Christian life.

TRS 357: Catechesis

3.00 Credits

For TRS Majors and Pastoral Ministry Certification Program students preparing for the ecclesial ministry of catechesis. Examines how the Church has over the centuries catechized its faithful; identifies the nature, goals, principles, and process of catechesis by looking specifically at the Directories for catechesis; defines the relationships that exist between catechesis and other ecclesial ministries; considers some of the contemporary approaches to catechesis; and acquaints students with the pastoral ministry of catechesis by observing and reporting on some sessions of a parish catechetical program. Department Consent Required

TRS 357A: Jesus the Teacher: Parables, Proverbs and Metaphors

3.00 Credits

A course primarily for Education Majors. This course is an integration of Christology and catechesis. Students will explore the scriptures to discover (1) how Jesus taught others (methods for catechesis), (2) the socio-political and religious milieu of first-century Palestine (importance of context for catechesis), (3) what Jesus says about himself and the Father (the theological content for catechesis), and (4) the effect of coming to know Jesus as the Christ (kerygma and discipleship). In addition, the course will offer a survey of contemporary methods for forming Christian disciples through catechesis.

TRS 358: Ministry with Vulnerable Populations

3.00 Credits

For Certificate in Pastoral Ministry students and other TRS majors/minors interested in knowing the Biblical, theological and social doctrine of the Church as it applies to ministry with the vulnerable. It examines the cultural and societal dynamics that shape systemic structures affecting the poor, the elderly, the infirm, etc. It also trains students in basic skills required to faithfully minister to this important part of our society. Department consent required.

TRS 359: Teenagers:The Church Today and Tomorrow

3.00 Credits

The course is structured according to USCCB document, 'Renewing the Vision'. In the course students will learn the theological and ecclesial principles of a comprehensive Catholic youth ministry program, as well as the role of the youth minister as catechist. At the end of the course students will be able to outline a comprehensive parish youth ministry program, identifying the basic theological content for a program and have the necessary professional skills for implementing the program. The course is designed to be highly interactive. Department Consent Required

TRS 360: The Catholic Church Today

3.00 Credits

A discussion of opportunities and challenges facing the Catholic Church today both its internal life and in its relationships with and activities in the contemporary world.

TRS 361: Vatican II: The Church in Council

3.00 Credits

Studies the 1962-65 ecumenical council as the Church's response to the challenges of modern culture; theology of the Church and Church's mission in the world; role of the laity; relation to other churches and to non-Christian religions. Post-conciliar tensions and developments.

TRS 362: Theology of the Church

3.00 Credits

As an introduction to ecclesiology, this course seeks to provide a fundamental understanding the Church's origin, nature, structure, and mission. Old Testament precursors to the Church will be discussed as well as various New Testament texts about the Church. The course will also study magisterial and theological writings pertaining to the Church from various historical periods, including: the Patristic era, the Middle Ages, and modernity. In addition, this course seeks to elucidate the connection between the mystery of the Church and other mysteries of the Christian faith. Some of the topics to be discussed are: the divine origin of the Church, the Church as the body and bride of Christ, the papacy, episcopal collegiality, the Church as local and universal, the three-fold munera of the Church (to govern, to teach, and to sanctify), and the Church in the modern world. Ecumenical concerns will also be considered in connection with some of these topics

TRS 362R: Theology of the Church in Rome

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 363: Jesus as the Christ: Contemporary Perspectives

3.00 Credits

The question of the "historical Jesus." OrigIn and meaning of belief in Jesus' resurrection. The christological process in the New Testament, classical dogma, and contemporary challenges.

TRS 363R: Christology in the City of Rome

3.00 Credits

The past two thousand years of Roman history is marked by Christianity. Indeed, for much of this time, and still today for Roman Catholics, Rome was and is the premier Christian city, rivaling the Holy Land as a place of pilgrimage, prayer, and encounter with Jesus Christ. The course will study this aspect of Rome by examining the Christian understanding of Jesus, his life, death, resurrection, his continued presence in the Church, and his influence on Christians throughout time. It will use the places, the architecture, and the art of Rome to illustrate and deepen the reading of classic texts in Christology. Through this course, students will come to a critical understanding of the Christian belief in Jesus as the Christ and Son of God and how this belief is manifest throughout ages in texts, images, and architecture.

TRS 364: The Catholic Church and Ecumenism

3.00 Credits

This course will discuss the involvement of the Catholic Church in the ecumenical movement from both an historical and a theological perspective. Attention will be given to the many dialogues the Catholic Church is now conducting, e.g. with the Eastern Orthodox, Anglicans, Lutherans, Methodists. What are the achievements, the problems and the prospects?

TRS 365: The Triune God

3.00 Credits

What does it mean that Christians confess God to be Father, Son and Holy Spirit? How has this traditional faith changed the way human beings have thought about God? What significance should trinitarian faith have in the lives and prayers of Christians?

TRS 367: Theology of the Patristic Period

3.00 Credits

Explores the theology of the Fathers of the Church from the end of the Apostolic period to the beginning of the medieval and Byzantine periods. This class includes attention to the period's significant themes, figures, and ecumenical councils.

TRS 367A: Unity and Diversity: Theology in the Middle Ages

3.00 Credits

Covers the breadth of the medieval heritage, from its grounding in Augustine and Jerome, to its ecclesial, lay and scholastic forms in both East and West. Anselm, Bonaventure and Aquinas receive particular attention as do their contribution to our understanding of issues of theological method, Trinitarian theology, Christology, and Sacraments.

TRS 369: The Protestant Experience

3.00 Credits

This course is a critical investigation of the ethos of Protestantism, with particular attention to its emergence in the 16th century and its subsequent development in North America. Key figures, themes, and denominational developments within Protestantism will be examined.

TRS 371: Marriage & Annulments in the Catholic Church

3.00 Credits

The development of the Catholic Church's teaching on marriage and the canonical discipline based on that teaching from the New Testament to today. The origin of the Church's practice of declaring certain marriages invalid. The current law and procedure governing annulments.

TRS 373: Theology, Science and Technologies

3.00 Credits

Comparison and contrast of religious beliefs and practices, scientific methodologies and developments, and their technological impacts on world cultures. Current and historical issues.

TRS 375: The Creeds

3.00 Credits

The Bible is the holy text of the Church. Yet, our understanding of Christian Faith is more often formed by the Creeds. The Apostolic and Nicene Creeds are the two ancient Creeds still in use in the Church. The course will focus upon the origin and meaning of those Creeds, especially in their relation to Scripture and to modern challenges towards Christian Faith.

TRS 376: Mary, Mother of God, Mother of the Church

3.00 Credits

The place of Mary in Christian doctrine and devotion across the centuries.

TRS 377: John Henry Newman: Life and Writings

3.00 Credits

The life of Cardinal John Henry Newman (1801-1890) in relation to his vision of higher education (The Idea of a University), the role of the laity in the life of the Church (On Consulting the Faithful),and his spirituality (Parochial and Plain Sermons). .

TRS 380: Religion in American Culture

3.00 Credits

An interdisciplinary thematic examination of religion in American society. Topics include Puritanism, religion and social reform, utopian perfectionism, popular piety, fundamentalism, new religious movements, religion and ethnicity, and other varieties of American religious experience.

TRS 381: Ways of Peace in World Religions

3.00 Credits

Explores the cultivation of peace in three dimensions: peace with self, society, and the divine. Course materials drawn from various world religions, including classical and contemporary discussion of the dynamics of peacemaking. Emphasis on native American, Taoist, Buddhist, Jain and Hindu traditions, with considerable discussion of practical spiritual techniques.

TRS 382: Religion and Public Policy

3.00 Credits

Designed to provide an introduction to the relationship between religious values and public policy in the American context. Both historical aspects and contemporary issues will be examined.

TRS 383: Issues in Religious Studies

3.00 Credits

Introduces students to the academic discipline of religious studies. From its initial break with theology in the 16th century, religious studies has grown to incorporate theories and perspectives from anthropology, psychology, sociology, philosophy, and hermeneutics. This course will survey significant themes and thinkers in all of these fields, including Sigmund Freud, David Hume, Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber, and many others. The course will also examine how religious bodies themselves make use of theories of religion in their institutional life and practice.

TRS 384: Sects/Cults/New Religious Movements

3.00 Credits

An interdisciplinary examination of the historical, social, cultural, and theological dynamics of select religious movements primarily, but not exclusively, in post-World War II American society. Topics include religious movements as social phenomena, conversion and recruitment controversies, Eastern religion in America, fundamentalism and Christian revivalism, New Age spirituality, and apocalyptic movements.

TRS 385: Religion & Ecology

3.00 Credits

Examines interrelated issues pertaining to religion, ecology, science, and technology. Includes religious and ethical issues related to cosmology, nature, global environmental problems, and types of ecological spirituality and theology.

TRS 386: Apocalypse:Religious & Cultural Meaning

3.00 Credits

Are we living in the "final days"? An interdisciplinary examination of "end times" prophecy belief in American thought and culture; also, origins and cultural consequences of biblical apocalyptic thinking in the American experience. Topics: theories of "dispensationalism", pre- and post-millennialism, the role of America in millennial prophecy literature, impact of the Cold War and Nuclear Age on apocalyptic thinking; millenarian thinking in new religious movements, environmental radicalism, American Catholicism, Fundamentalism, and Christian reconstructionism. Secular versions of apocalypticism in quasi-religious survivalist and militia movements.

TRS 387: Playing God: Genetics, Ecology, and Religion

3.00 Credits

Explores contemporary issues in the philosophy of religion, focusing on the existence and nature of God; faith, language, and religious experience; and evil, ethics, and the afterlife. Readings include selections by contemporary religious and secular philosophers.

TRS 388: Religion and Sports

3.00 Credits

Many contemporary sports ' as human activities directed toward perfection ' have their origin in religious festivals. This class explores the dynamics of 'sport as religion' and investigates how sport can be considered as such. Topics covered include: sports as a religious system and an organizing structure of existence; the 'religious-like' behavior of sport fans relative to their teams; sporting ground as sacred space; value of religion and spirituality in enhancing athletic performance; the ecstasy of performing well; and the use of sport as a medium for evangelistic enterprises

TRS 390: Taoism & Confucianism

3.00 Credits

Explores the two major indigenous religious traditions of China through their canonical texts, core concepts, devotional practices, and historical development.

TRS 391: Introduction to Buddhism

3.00 Credits

The course will survey the Buddhist tradition from its inception to the present. Beginning with the life and teachings of the historical Buddha in their social and religious milieu, the course will proceed to the development of the Buddhist order, advances in Indian Buddhist thought, the rise of the Mahayana movement, the spread of Buddhism into other parts of Asia (China, Tibet, Japan, Korea, Southeast Asia), modern popular Buddhist movements, and the spread of Buddhism into North America and Europe.

TRS 391A: Chinese and Japanese Buddhism

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 392: Hinduism: Religion and Art

3.00 Credits

Designed as an introduction to Hinduism, this course explores connecting points between religion, literature and the arts in the context of classical and modern Hindu cultures. Studies the stories, iconography, temples, and theologies of the gods and goddesses of India: Vishnu, Krishna, Shiva, and Devi. Introduces the students to Indian religious wisdom in the Bhagavadgita, the Upanishads, devotional literature, and Indian philosophy. Examines pilgrimages that link the mythological and artistic complex to the mountains, rivers, and cities of India. Familiarizes the students with culture and religious practices of contemporary Hindu communities in the Washington D.C. area.

TRS 393: Classic Texts of World Religions

3.00 Credits

This course has two objectives: (1) to expose students to the classic texts of a variety of world religions, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Taoism, and Confucianism in order to promote basic religious literacy; and (2) to explore the concept of "scripture" as a cross-cultural category in religious studies by comparing how texts become canonical, and what canonicity means in practice as a text is read and used within its own tradition. For concentrators and qualified advanced students; permission of STRS associate dean for undergraduate studies required.

TRS 395: Christian Muslim Relations

3.00 Credits

Surveys the growth of Islam within Jewish and Christian context. Presents the basic teachings of the Qu'ran and discusses Christian/Muslim dialogue in the modern world.

TRS 395A: Jewish Christian Relations

3.00 Credits

Distinctive to a Catholic view of Judaism is the conviction that the identities of Judaism and Christianity are inextricably intertwined. In light of the connection between these ancient traditions, this course examines Jewish-Christian relations from antiquity to the modern era. The course investigates the Jewish Christ, the origins of Christian anti-Semitism, Jewish-Christian encounters in the medieval period, the Holocaust, and views of the Church's relationship to the Jewish people and the state of Israel in contemporary theology.

TRS 395B: War and Peace in the Abrahamic Traditions

3.00 Credits

This course examines reflection on war and peace in the Abrahamic traditions (Judaism, Christianity and Islam). The course introduces students to the historical development of Jewish, Christian, and Muslim views of war and peace with attention to how the theological reading of sacred texts shaped each tradition. The course also examines contemporary views of war and peace among the three Abrahamic traditions as well as a variety of interfaith peacemaking practices that have emerged as a result of interreligious dialogue.

TRS 396: Basic Jewish Texts

3.00 Credits

Surveys the texts, Biblical, Rabbinic, Medieval, and modern, which have shaped Jewish thought and the Jewish experience. Students will read texts with an understanding of the historical setting in which they were written and the issues which the writer seeks to address. Also presented will be texts supplementary to the source.

TRS 397: Introduction to Judaism

3.00 Credits

Provides a survey of Jewish practices relating to the religious calendar, rites of passage within the religious community, and an overview of the belief system from which these practices emerge.

TRS 398: Introduction to Islam

3.00 Credits

This course aims to provide a comprehensive introduction to Islam, as both a religion and a tradition consisting of various schools of thought. After examining the origin of Islam and the history and themes of the Quran as a main source of Islam, this course will give a general view of almost every important Islamic Issues such as Islamic Philosophy, Islamic Mysticism (Sufism), Islamic Law, and human rights.

TRS 398A: Introduction to the Qur'an

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 398B: Islam in American

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 399: Islamic Thought: Selected Topics

3.00 Credits

Just as biblical themes and stories have permeated much of western civilization, so Islamic culture, both Arabic and non-Arabic, is imbued with quranic imagery. Through a close reading of a selection of writings from the Islamic word (in English translation), TRS 399 will explore the relationship between the quranic text and later Islamic civilization. Topics covered will include stories of the prophets, family law, and contemporary approaches to the Quran.

TRS 400: Special Topics in Old Testament

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 410: Special Topics in New Testament

3.00 Credits

This course examines the contribution of visual artists as interpreters of the Gospels, drawing on the concept of `visual exegesis' to complement more traditional methods of gospel study. A range of artists and artworks from different periods and cultural contexts will be considered (including interpretations of key Gospel scenes such as the Nativity, the Baptism of Christ, the Sermon on the Mount and the Passion and Resurrection).

TRS 420: Special Topics in Church History

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 430B: Special Topics in Moral Theology/Ethics

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 430C: Special Topics in Moral Theology/Ethics: Medieval Pathways:Medieval Bodies

3.00 Credits

An interdisciplinary course exploring the complexity of the medieval world (ca. 300-1500) and introducing students to the study of the Middle Ages. Consists of three modules representing three different modes of inquiry, or pathways to the Middle Ages (e.g., political and social history, art and architecture, vernacular literatures, manuscript studies and paleography, thought and worship, etc.). Team-taught by three faculty members and an overseer according to a joint syllabus planned around a unifying theme (subject to change every semester). Includes several field trips and special presentations. Gateway course to the Medieval and Byzantine Studies major and minor; fulfills the Arts & Sciences humanities requirement

TRS 440: Special Topics in Liturgy/Sacraments

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 451: Special Topics in Religious Education

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 452: Special Topics in Spirituality

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 453: The Practice of Pastoral Ministry

3.00 Credits

This course examines the nature and function of pastoral theology for students desiring to become pastoral leaders. Students utilize their theological knowledge and examine how they integrate it into the praxis of ministry. They also explore the relational, spiritual and professional dimensions of public ministry that call the baptized to discipleship lived in relationship to God's mission. Limited to Certificate in Pastoral Ministry candidates or Theology majors and minors. Limited enrollment; consent required.

TRS 454: Introduction to Hispanic Ministry

3.00 Credits

Pastoral aspects of the Hispanic/Latino presence in the United States: mestizaje, comunidad, and religiosidad popular. The challenge of implementing the National Pastoral Plan. Field visits and guest speakers. (Knowledge of Spanish helpful, but not required.)

TRS 460: Special Topics in Theology

3.00 Credits

Spring 2014: Augustine's Confessions is the history of the schooling of the author's heart in the love of God, which is presented simultaneously as a narrative, theological reflection, and prayer. Augustine tells his story in the form of various conversions: from the quest of wisdom (Cicero) to Manicheism, skepticism, Neoplatonic philosophy, and Catholic Christianity. As an imitation literature (protreptikos), Confessions invites the readers to ponder about the operations of God's grace in their lives

TRS 465: Christian Theology I

3.00 Credits

Christian Theology I & II provide an in-depth examination of central Christian teachings attentive to historical development and systematic coherence. Christian Theology I will treat Trinity, Creation, Fall and Christology.

TRS 466: Christian Theology II

3.00 Credits

Christian Theology I & II provide an in-depth examination of central Christian teachings attentive to historical development and systematic coherence. Christian Theology II will treat Christology, Ecclesiology, Sacraments, Eschatology.

TRS 480: Special Topics in Religious Studies

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 485: Ways of Studying Religion

3.00 Credits

An interdisciplinary survey of methods in the study of religion and culture. The course presents, inter alia, anthropological, sociological, phenomenological, psychological, and economic approaches to religious studies. Major figures (e.g. Marx, Freud, Weber, Durkheim, Geertz) and diverse genres of critical reflection (film, literature, oratory, ethnography) are examined.

TRS 490: Special Topics in World Religions

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 491: Theology of World Religions

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 492: Directed Reading

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 495: Internship in Pastoral Ministry

3.00 Credits

The internship is a seminar offered in connection with an approved internship in a pastoral ministry setting. This involves 10-12 hours at the assigned site each week. In addition to this time, students meet for a weekly reflection on their ministry through presentations, short written assignments and directed readings.

TRS 497: Capstone Seminar in Theology and Religious Studies

3.00 Credits

This is a seminar designed for, and required of, seniors who are majoring in Theology and Religious Studies. It will examine major methodological approaches to theology and religious studies, while focusing on a theme, author, or text(different each semester) such as creation narratives, the works of Augustine, the just war tradition, etc. A major research paper will be required.

TRS 498: Undergraduate Comprehensive Examination

0.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 500A: Theological Latin

0.00 Credits

Knowledge of Latin is required for all STRS degrees except the D.Min. This course, which should be taken during the student's first fall semester of study, fulfills the Latin requirement for the M.A.,, S.T.B., and M.Div. degrees. Licentiate and doctoral students need to fulfill the Latin requirements of their program area.

TRS 500B: Spanish for Pastoral Ministry

3.00 Credits

Use of Spanish in sacramental practice and ministerial situations. Classes utilize role plays and didactic presentations; students are expected to choose site visits according to level of proficiency in Spanish. Prerequisite: One year of college Spanish or equivalent.

TRS 500C: Greek for Seminarians

3.00 Credits

A one-semester stand-alone Greek course for seminarians and M.Div. students.

TRS 501: Theological German

0.00 Credits

Involves in-class translations, by the students, of German texts in the various areas of theology. A basic knowledge of German grammar is presupposed. (Previously THEO 504)

TRS 502: Greek for Theology

0.00 Credits

A basic introduction to the main elements of the grammar of New Testament Greek with an emphasis on reading passages from the Gospels.

TRS 503A: Elementary Biblical Greek

3.00 Credits

An intensive introduction to the phonology, morphology, syntax, and vocabulary of New Testament Greek.

TRS 503B: Intermediate Biblical Greek

3.00 Credits

An intensive introduction to the phonology, morphology, syntax, and vocabulary of New Testament Greek.

TRS 504A: Introduction to The Old Testament

3.00 Credits

This course will introduce students to the Old Testament and will explore its most significant theological concepts as well as follow up the complex process of its history of composition.

TRS 504B: Introduction to the New Testament

3.00 Credits

An overview of the New Testament books that provides essential background for understanding the texts of the New Testament. This course will examine the idea of the New Testament (canon), various methods of study of the New Testament, the Church's understanding as to how the New Testament is to be studied, and the theological notion of inspiration.

TRS 540: Introduction to Liturgy

3.00 Credits

Basic introduction to the history and theology of the liturgy of the Church; attention to constitutive elements of worship (word, language, music, environment, ritual); relationship of liturgy and spirituality.

TRS 550: Teaching and Learning in Theology and Religious Studies

3.00 Credits

This course will introduce theology/religious studies students to effective teaching practices. It will provide practical suggestions for planning, conducting and evaluating instruction. Finally, this course is intended to foster insight into the relationship between theory and practice through interaction with resource persons and observation experiences.

TRS 556: Pastoral and Human Formation for Priests

3.00 Credits

This course will address issues in the pastoral and human formation of Catholic priests. Such issues as human sexuality and celibacy, managing stress, building healthy personal relationships, pastoral boundaries, internet use and misuse, preventing burnout, care for the caregiver, managing anger and human emotions, and other current issues will be covered. There will be a particular emphasis on a positive integration of the spirituality of priesthood with the personal challenges of priesthood today.

TRS 560: Functions of Philosophy in Theology

3.00 Credits

Covers Christian faith and the place of philosophy in theological discourses; the relationship between natural reason and faith as reflected in early Church councils, the work of Anselm and Aquinas, and modern philosophy; hermeneutics and Christian experience; natural ethics and the theological virtues; philosophy as the exploration of natural necessities and theology as the thought about faith and revelation.

TRS 562A: Foundations of Catholicism

3.00 Credits

This two semester course introduces fundamental beliefs that constitute the Church's confession of faith. As an overview of Catholic faith, it seeks to ensure an appreciation of biblical revelation, the history and doctrine of the Church, Catholic heritage of prayer and spiritual tradition, liturgy and sacraments, Catholic ethics, social teaching and Catholic culture and piety.

TRS 562B: Foundation in Catholicism

3.00 Credits

This two semester course introduces fundamental beliefs that constitute the Church's confession of faith. As an overview of Catholic faith, it seeks to ensure an appreciation of biblical revelation, the history and doctrine of the Church, Catholic heritage of prayer and spiritual tradition, liturgy and sacraments, Catholic ethics, social teaching and Catholic culture and piety.

TRS 590CMR: Introduction to Islam

3.00 Credits

This course aims to provide a comprehensive introduction to Islam, as both a religion and a tradition consisting of various schools of thought. After examining the origin of Islam and the history and themes of the Quran as a main source of Islam, this course will give a general view of various aspects of Islam such as Islamic Philosophy, Islamic Mysticism (Sufism), Islamic Law, and Islamic views on human rights.

TRS 591CMR: History of Christian-Muslim Relations

3.00 Credits

In this course we will discuss some of the most important theological topics in the encounters between adherents of Islam and Christianity, both in the Medieval and in the contemporary period. The topics will include dialogues and polemics about the nature and the properties of God; creation; the status and role of human beings; revelation and the Word of God; role and function of prophets; and the limits of human language about God. We will try to do justice to the Scriptural, the theological and the mystical traditions of the two religions.

TRS 592CMR: Developing Christian-Muslim Relationships in Practice

3.00 Credits

This course examines three areas of shared concern between Muslim and Christian communities in the United States: 1.) spiritual resources in the respective traditions to sustain individual believers during their transitions from birth through maturity to death; 2) authority and responsibility of leaders in their respective communities of believers; 3) relations of the community of believers to society at large, including participation in civic life and bearing witness. The participants will work on a local project as a final assignment for this course.

TRS 593CMR: The Challenge of Religious Diversity in American Culture

3.00 Credits

This is a thematic and interdisciplinary course that examines religious diversity in the American context. Select topics include the nature of diversity and conformity tensions, inter and intra-faith Protestant-Catholic-Jewish conflict, pluralism in the context of civil religion and American exceptionalism, facing new religious movements, the De-Europeanization of American Christianity, Islam and the new immigration, interfaith marriage, and contemporary social and behavioral science research on religious pluralism and diversity.

TRS 600A: Advanced Biblical Greek I

3.00 Credits

Philological study of New Testament texts chosen to suit needs of students, including textual criticism, analysis of linguistic patterns, and problems of translation and Semitic interference.

TRS 600B: Advanced Biblical Greek II

3.00 Credits

Philological study of New Testament texts chosen to suit needs of students, including textual criticism, analysis of linguistic patterns, and problems of translation and Semitic interference.

TRS 601: Pentateuch

3.00 Credits

Examines the literatures and theologies of the first five books of the Bible.

TRS 602: The Psalms

3.00 Credits

A study of the book of Psalms and its use in worship and liturgy. Includes detailed study of selected psalms.

TRS 603: Prophecy in Israel

3.00 Credits

Presents general background information on the phenomenon of prophecy and then focuses on a more detailed study of selected prophetic books.

TRS 604: Wisdom Literature

3.00 Credits

After some preliminary notions concerning the phenomenon of "wisdom" in Israel and its environment, focuses on a study of the five Old Testament Wisdom Books: Proverbs, Sirach, Job, Qoheleth, and Wisdom.

TRS 605: Apocalyptic Literature

3.00 Credits

Orientation to the apocalyptic phenomenon and detailed study of selected apocalyptic texts.

TRS 607: The Synoptic Gospels

3.00 Credits

An introduction to the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke. After a discussion of the synoptic problem and the nature of the Gospel material, each Gospel is studied in terms of its historical setting and theology.

TRS 609: The Gospel According to John

3.00 Credits

Considers major introductory questions: author, literary history, and the time and circumstances that produced the canonical Gospel. Consideration of major passages. Special attention to an understanding of the narrative design of the Gospel and its contribution to the development of Christian understanding of God, the Christ, and the Christian community.

TRS 610: The Pauline Letters

3.00 Credits

An introduction to the canonical letters attributed to St. Paul. Lectures focus on the nature of Paul's letters, the circumstances which occasioned them, and the theology of Paul reflected in his writings.

TRS 620: Introduction to Patristic Theology

3.00 Credits

This course is an investigation of the main theological issues, theologians, theological controversies, and religious movements in the early church. It covers the period from the second to the fifth century, from Apostolic Fathers to Augustine, from Gnosticism to Pelagianism.

TRS 620A: The Writing of Church History

3.00 Credits

A survey of the major church historians, from Eusebius to H. Jedin, with particular attention to the context of their work, their sources, method, and analysis.

TRS 621B: History of the Reformation

3.00 Credits

Examines current scholarship on such topics as the state of religion on the eve of the Reformation, Luther, the Peasants' War, diffusion of Reformation ideas (printing, sermons, art, etc.), Reformation in German cities, origins of Anabaptism, Calvin, evangelism in Italy, role of civil government in the English Reformation, women, Jews, witch-craze, confessionalization, and the effects of the Reformation.

TRS 621C: Church History from the High Middle Ages to the Present

3.00 Credits

This course, the second in a survey of all of Church History, starts from the dawn of a new civilization in the mid-eleventh century, when cultural, economic, religious, and social changes all created a new and dynamic European era, during which the Church itself went through dynamic changes. Proceeding down through the centuries, this course provides an overview of the major developments in the History of the Church through the end of the pontificate of Benedict XVI. At the same time it focuses on particular thinkers and documents that shed light on the broader institutional developments in the High Middle Ages, the Early Modern period, and the Modern era. Owing to the broad scope (almost a millenium of Church History) this course, which combines lectures and seminar-style discussion, requires both substantial preparatory reading and in-class participation in the discussions.

TRS 622: Ancient and Medieval Church History

3.00 Credits

A survey of the history of Christianity from the first century to 1300. Topics include the rise of the episcopate, persecution, conversion of Constantine, doctrinal controversies, monasticism, Carolingian reform, growth of the papacy, investiture controversy, scholasticism, and medieval heresies.

TRS 623A: The Roman Catholic Missionary Experience of the 16th Century

3.00 Credits

A survey of the expansion of Christianity into Latin America, Africa, and the Orient, especially through the efforts of the Franciscan, Dominican, and Jesuit orders, with attention to the role of the Spanish and Portuguese governments and to the problems of cultural adaptation.

TRS 623B: Renewal of Religious Life in the Catholic Church of the 15th and 16th Centuries

3.00 Credits

A study of the reform of the monastic and mendicant orders and the origins of the Capuchins, Brothers and Sisters of the Common Life, Theatines, Barnabites, Somaschi, Jesuits, Oratorians, Ministers of the Sick, and Ursulines.

TRS 624C: Church and Society in France: 1750-1950

3.00 Credits

The Gallican Church, the Church and the French Revolution, liberal Catholicism, social Catholicism, anticlericalism, Ultramontanism, Catholic spirituality and life, First Ralliement, Christian democracy, separation of church and state, Modernism, Americanism, Second Ralliement, Action Francaise, Action Catholique, the Church during World War II, and the Church and the Fourth Republic.

TRS 624D: Church and Society in Spain: 1650-1875

3.00 Credits

The Church under the Habsburgs: church and state, religious controversies; the Church under the Bourbons: church and state, reactions to the Enlightenment, the case of the Jesuits, conflicts with the liberal movement, Concordat of 1851, the Revolution of 1851, and popular religion and spirituality.

TRS 626: The Holy See and Diplomacy

3.00 Credits

A survey of modern European international relations from the perspective of the papacy, centered on case studies of episodes and negotiations in major diplomatic relationships.

TRS 627: Catholics in a Non-Catholic World: Religious Identities, Anti-Catholicism, and Nativism

3.00 Credits

An exploration of the self-understandings of Catholics in a society characterized by religious pluralism, separation of church and state, and periodic hostility toward Catholics and immigrants. Emphasizes the dynamics involved in forming American-Catholic identities during particular periods and in social-religious contexts. The periodical press and the literature of various persons and movements will be the primary source materials for research papers

TRS 629A: American Catholic Identities 1800-1970

3.00 Credits

After an exploration of mission Catholicism in the Colonial period, focus is on the major developments in American Catholic History. Emphasizes the dynamics between religion and culture. The formation of religious identities is the organizing principles of lectures and class discussion: thus, the thematic thread unifying this introductory course in the question of what constitutes American and Catholic identities throughout the eveolution of Church and society.

TRS 629B: American Catholicism

3.00 Credits

American Catholicism treats the founding and adaptation of the Catholic Church and its diverse peoples in the United States from colonial backgrounds to the twenty-first century. Key events, trends, and figures as well as characteristics of each period organize the course. Themes related to the laity, vowed religious, clergy, and models of leadership are integrated into the historical narrative. The course stresses the themes useful for students as future ministers and leaders.

TRS 630A: Foundations of Christian Moral Life

3.00 Credits

Examines the biblical foundations, historical development, and the contemporary debates with in Christian moral theology. The roles of scripture, natural law, church teaching, theological anthropology, and virtue theory as sources for moral decision making will be considered. Attention to the notions of sin, conscience, and conversion, as well as recent developments in the various branches of moral theology.

TRS 630MC: Christ and the Moral Life

3.00 Credits

This course presents an overview of the foundations of Catholic moral theology. It focuses on the meaning of human freedom, virtue, conscience, sin and grace in light of a proper understanding of the nature of the human person. The primary aim of this course is to describe and demonstrate how moral theology can be incorporated into catechetical programs in order to better form moral persons. The course also considered some of the decisive moments in the history of moral theology with particular attention to the recent and important contributions made by John Pall II.

TRS 631: Christian Marriage and Family

3.00 Credits

Examines the biblical understanding of marriage and family, its development in the history of Christian thought, and contemporary debates concerning marital and sexual ethics. Special attention to the sacramentality of marriage, its indissolubility, full equality of spouses, and ethical questions concerning sexual activity and procreation. Issues treated within framework of a theology of marriage and family as covenant and a virtue based approach to sexual ethics.

TRS 632A: Christian Social Ethics

3.00 Credits

The course introduces students to the salient themes and important documents in the Catholic church's developing social thought. Primary emphasis is on the encyclical tradition, but every effort will be made to place these in historical and social context by reference to other literature.

TRS 632D: Biomedical Ethics

3.00 Credits

An introduction to biomedical ethics in theological perspective. Issues such as euthanasia and abortion, access to health care and related economic issues, identity of Catholic health care facilities and religious pluralism, ethics of research, reproductive technologies and genetic testing are considered in light of fundamental Christian convictions regarding health and sickness, suffering, death, and the purpose of medicine.

TRS 632E: Biomedical Ethics for Nursing

3.00 Credits

Examines biomedical ethics in a Catholic theological perspective. Select beginning of life and end of life issues and such issues as the identity of Catholic health care facilities, healthcare laws, and the ethics of research are considered in light of fundamental Christian convictions regarding the dignity of the human person, health and sickness, suffering, death, the purpose of medicine, and the practices of healthcare providers. Designed with the needs of graduate nursing students in mind, and in light of the mission of the School of Nursing, it aims to provide students with opportunities to explore the impact of ethical issues on their personal and professional lives.

TRS 640: Foundations of Liturgy and Sacramental Theology

3.00 Credits

This overview and systematic study of constitutive elements of liturgical rites and sacramental theology analyzes the historical developments which facilitate understanding the contemporary praxis. This process demonstrates the relationship between lex orandi and lex credendi. Should be taken before any other course in sacraments or liturgy.

TRS 641A: Sacraments of Initiation

3.00 Credits

A historical and theological study of the rites of Christian initiation in both East and West from the New Testament to the present with a view to understanding more deeply the rites as reformed by order of the Second Vatican Council. Special attention will be given to the Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults.

TRS 641B: Eucharist

3.00 Credits

A historical, theological and liturgical study of the Eucharist, examining the development of the Church's understanding of this sacrament through four main periods: New Testament; patristic; scholastic; and modern. Recent ecumenical perspectives on the Eucharist are also considered, together with a number of aspects of contemporary discussion of this sacrament.

TRS 641C: Sacraments of Reconciliation and Anointing

3.00 Credits

A theological and historical study of the liturgical rite of sacramental reconciliation and of the anointing and pastoral care of the sick. Participants will distill the theological significance of these sacraments from the rites and euchological texts of their liturgical celebration. Students who are candidates for ordination will be given a confessional practicum in conjunction with this course. This course is best taken after 641A and 641B and after some study of Moral Theology.

TRS 641D: Ordained Ministries

3.00 Credits

A historical, theological and liturgical study of Ordained Ministries, examining the development of the Church's understanding of the sacrament of Holy Orders through four main periods: New Testament; patristic; scholastic; and modern. Recent ecumenical perspectives on Ordination are considered, together with canonical aspects, the relationship between Holy Orders and celibacy, and the relationship between Holy Orders and gender.

TRS 641MC: Eucharist: Summit and Font of Christian Life

3.00 Credits

This course introduces students to the history, theology, and practice of the Roman Catholic celebration of the Eucharist. Throughout the course, students will gain familiarity with the texts, ritual forms, and theological content of the Eucharist. Students will consider how the Eucharist, particularly as celebrated within the context of the Mass, provides a foundation and framework for teaching, ministry, and faith formation. Students will apply course content to a pastoral setting by developing written projects and responses which consider the celebration of the Eucharist as a context for catechesis.

TRS 643A: Ministry of Liturgical Presider

1.00 Credits

Consideration of the Church's liturgical heritage, reflection the introductions to the Church's rites, and classroom experiences in presidential leadership combine to develop the students' abilities to preside at eucharistic and other sacramental liturgies. Limited enrollment.

TRS 643MC: Liturgical Catechesis I (RCIA)

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 644: Canon Law and Sacramental Ministry

3.00 Credits

This course studies the canonical provisions for the valid and licit celebration of six sacraments (Sacraments of Christian Initiation, Penance, Anointing of the Sick, and Orders) in light of history and liturgical rites. Particular attention will be given to issues arising from the celebration of the sacraments as actions of Christ and the Church within a given community. In preparation for future ministry, the students will address case studies dealing with practical issues and problems. Prerequisite: TRS 665A

TRS 644A: Canon Law of Marriage

3.00 Credits

A study of the principal canons on matrimony in their historical and doctrinal context: the canonical definition of marriage and its ends and properties, canonical preparation for marriage, impediments, form of marriage, mixed marriage, dissolution of the bond, convalidation. Attention will also be given to how marriages can be declared invalid. Prerequisite TRS 665A.

TRS 650A: Introduction to the History of Christian Spirituality

3.00 Credits

A consideration of Christian spirituality both as a lived experience and as an academic discipline. Focuses on the major figures and movements in the history of Christian spirituality. A number of texts by these figures will be studied, including some from the Protestant tradition.

TRS 650B: Modern Spirituality

3.00 Credits

Lecture examines the most important movements and figures in Christian spirituality in the past 100 years, with emphasis on the most recent decades within that time frame.

TRS 650C: Eastern Spirituality

3.00 Credits

This course presents an introduction into the spiritual traditions of the Syriac speaking and Byzantine Churches. It will study the writings of the major figures of each tradition with the view of developing the common themes that characterize the spirituality of the Eastern Churches. It will also provide the theological world-view out of which these spiritual writers developed their insights.

TRS 651A: Psychology and Religion

3.00 Credits

Psychology of religion in a historical perspective, with focus on such pioneer figures as James, Boisen, and Freud. An analysis of the dialogue between religion and psychology, with emphasis on such figures as Jung, Homans, and Browning. Contemporary perspectives of religion and psychology on selected topics such as mysticism, prayer, discernment, conversion, sin, and guilt.

TRS 651C: Evolution and Its Theological Implications

3.00 Credits

The goal of this course is to provide students with the intellectual tools necessary for a dynamic and fruitful Christian spiritual life and ministry in an evolutionary universe. Science itself has an important insight to present to theology, by showing the complexity, the grandeur, and yet the mathematical simplicity of the universe we inhabit, with whatever conclusions one can draw from that about the nature of God. God works "in and through" the divinely created universe. Scientific discoveries are presented in order to enhance understanding of such important traditional theological topics as divine activity, suffering, original sin, prayer, love and other virtues.

TRS 652A: Basic Supervised Ministry I

3.00 Credits

A two-semester course. A student spends a minimum of four hours each week at a designated ministerial placement and two hours in a supervision seminar. Through the use of verbatim presentations, the seminar explores communication skills, interpersonal dynamics, theological reflection on issues raised, and the student's emerging pastoral identity. Students receive a written evaluation at the end of each semester. Limited enrollment.

TRS 652B: Basic Supervised Ministry II

3.00 Credits

A two-semester course. Building on TRS 652A, the seminar explores how to communicate the gospel in an appropriate, pastoral, caring way. Through the use of verbatim, video and role-play, attention is given to the process of theological reflection on ministerial encounters. Students receive a written evaluation at the end of each semester. Limited enrollment.

TRS 652C: Extended Pastoral Supervision

3.00 Credits

Students engaged in long-term pastoral ministry away from the campus will engage in pastoral reflection with the instructor, based on their pastoral journal entries and/or pastoral incident reports and feedback from their onsite supervisor in fulfillment of their learning contract. The course will be taught online. Pre-requisite: TRS 652A and 652B, Basic Supervised Ministry Note: this course does not satisfy the M.Div. supervision requirement.

TRS 652D: Supervised Ministry for Religious

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 652E: Carmelite Supervised Ministry Internship Part One

3.00 Credits

Designed for Carmelite seminarians engaged in a full-time Carmelite pastoral internship, this course engages students in theological reflection on their ministry. Students will draw from the Catholic theological tradition and their Carmelite charism/spirituality to make connections with the questions and concerns that arise from their pastoral practice. This is the first of a two-semester course. Area Director permission required to register.

TRS 652F: Carmelite Supervised Ministry Internship Part Two

3.00 Credits

Designed for Carmelite seminarians engaged in a full-time Carmelite pastoral internship, this course engages students in theological reflection on their ministry. Students will draw from the Catholic theological tradition and their Carmelite charism/spirituality to make connections with the questions and concerns that arise from their pastoral practice. This is the second of a two-semester course. TRS 652 E is the prerequisite course. Area Director permission required to register.

TRS 653A: Introduction to Liturgical Preaching

3.00 Credits

An introduction to the nature and purpose of preaching, the relationship between Word and Sacrament in the Catholic tradition, and the movement from biblical text to homily. Each student will preach four times during the semester. Prerequisite: TRS 607 or 609 or equivalent. Limited enrollment.

TRS 653C: Mystagogical Preaching

3.00 Credits

This course will explore and apply a mystagogical method of preaching at celebrations of the sacraments and other liturgical occasions. Each student will preach six times during the semester. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: TRS 653A or equivalent.

TRS 654: Introduction to Hispanic Ministry

3.00 Credits

This practice-oriented course will consider the following dimensions of Hispanic Ministry: [1] Hispanic Ministry as cross-cultural experience: cultures of context and content; [2] Hispanic/Latino communities: diversity, demographics, mestizaje; parish profiles; [3] feligreses: immigrants: internacionales e indocumentados, generación Ñ, guiones; [4] sacramental ministry: Bautismo, Misa, Primera Comunión, Bodas, Unción de enfermos; [5] religiosidad popular: fiestas, quinceañera, velorio, via crucis, día de los muertos; [6] pastoral de conjunto: grupos de oración, comunidades de base; [7] Dios Habla Hoy: preaching, bible study (Knowledge of Spanish is helpful, but not required for this course).

TRS 655: Ministry to Adolescents

3.00 Credits

The foundations, principles, and practices of effective ministry to adolescents. Modes of ministry include evangelization, catechesis, building community, fostering prayer and spirituality, and promoting social justice. Note: To successfully complete this course, students need internet access.

TRS 655MC: The New Evangelization and Catechesis

3.00 Credits

This course will examine the essential role and link between evangelization and catechesis as highlighted in various magisterial and USCCB documents and other theological commentary. The course will examine the biblical foundations for evangelization that provide the foundation for the Church's present day evangelization initiatives. The course will also discuss the role of the New Evangelization, what it is, what impact it can have and is having on the Church today and what implications the New Evangelization has for catechesis. The course will discuss the pastoral implications of forming Catholic disciples who understand that they are called through their baptism to share the Good News of Jesus Christ with others.

TRS 656: Pastoral Theology

3.00 Credits

Examines the nature, function, and developments of the discipline of Pastoral Theology. Engages students in the process of theological reflection on the act of ministry and on the implications of the American cultural context for ministry.

TRS 656A: Pastoral Counseling

3.00 Credits

Counseling theory and dynamics, the pastoral and theological dimensions of counseling, specific problem areas such as addiction, depression, faith struggles, transition, loss, etc. Didactic material and critiqued role-plays designed to refine student's style and method of pastoral counseling.

TRS 656B: Liturgical Ministry of the Religious Deacon

1.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 657A: The Art of Pastoral Leadership

3.00 Credits

The goal of this course is to enable students to develop and demonstrate pastoral leadership in a parish setting. Students will be engaged in the practice of parish ministry. The seminar addresses pastoral skills such as group facilitation (giving special attention to the dynamic of the capstone seminar group), pastoral planning, lay empowerment, the exercise of authority, the importance of boundaries, effective collaboration, conflict management, and pedagogy. Students will prepare a proposal for a parish project that they will implement in the second part of the capstone seminar.

TRS 657B: Pastoral Leadership: Reflection, Evaluation, and Integration

3.00 Credits

Reflection, Evaluation and Integration The goal of this course is the development and demonstration of pastoral leadership. Students will be engaged in the practice of parish ministry. Students develop a project for the parish community, which they will implement, or they will analyze and evaluate an existing program in which they are already engaged. Students will evaluate their strengths and weaknesses in terms of parish leadership with specific reference to the skills covered in TRS 657A and discuss ways in which they can hone their strengths and compensate for their weaknesses. They will consider how ministry enhances and solidifies pastoral identity. They will engage in a process of theological reflection on their ministry, their identity as pastoral leaders, and the connection between ministry and spirituality and their project in ministry. Prerequisite: TRS 657A

TRS 658: Introduction to Pastoral Ministry and Supervision

3.00 Credits

This course is specifically designed for Doctor of Ministry students who have never had a supervised pastoral ministry course and need to fulfill the DMin prerequisite requirement. As a result of readings, discussions and verbatim reports students will develop new awareness both of themselves as ministers and of the needs of those to whom they offer pastoral care and ministry.

TRS 660: History and Method in Theology

3.00 Credits

Historical survey outlining the development and differences of the basic categories, methods, criteria, and notions of theology throughout the history of Christian thought.

TRS 661: Christian Anthropology

3.00 Credits

Studies creation, the human person, and redemption in Jesus Christ in light of Scripture and the Catholic tradition. Addresses questions posed by modern and contemporary culture (e.g., belief, gender, the environment, etc.).

TRS 661A: Mariology

3.00 Credits

Historical, systematic and liturgical study of Mary as: the Mother of God, the Mother of the Church, her role in salvation, and her continued presence in the theological and lived experience of Christians through the centuries. Course of study will include biblical foundations, patristic, medieval and modern periods accentuating dogmatic formulations, liturgical praxis, artistic expressions and devotional practices. Prerequisite: Christology, TRS 667A or equivalent.

TRS 662: Revelation and Faith

3.00 Credits

Biblical dimensions and theoretical models of revelation and faith in light of the teaching of the Vatican Councils, current theological discussion and pastoral practice.

TRS 663: Christian Eschatology

3.00 Credits

A comprehensive theological survey of biblical and church teaching on the destiny and end of all things. Recent discussions of death, heaven, hell, purgatory, and the end of the world will be considered in light of basic theological principles.

TRS 664A: Theology of the Church

3.00 Credits

The nature, attributes, mission, and structure of the Church from a Roman Catholic perspective. Topics: history and method of ecclesiology, origins of the Church, local/universal Church, social mission, ecumenical concerns, papal and episcopal ministry, Mary and the Church. Lecture with some discussion.

TRS 665A: Basic Principles of Latin Canon Law

3.00 Credits

Examines the nature, history, and function of Latin Church law. Surveys the norms of the 1983 Code of Canon Law in the areas of general norms, the rights and obligations of the Christian faithful, Church structures, the teaching office of the Church, temporal goods, and sanctions.

TRS 665B: Introduction to Eastern Canon Law

3.00 Credits

Examines the development of Canon Law in the Eastern Church in light of their history and evolution. Surveys the sources, structure and norms of the 1990 Code of Canons of the Eastern Churches in the area of governance of and ascription to a Church sui iuris.

TRS 666: Theology of God

3.00 Credits

Situates the problem of God in the context of modern thought, and describes the tasks of theology in the face of contemporary atheism. Examines the possibility of human experience and knowledge of God with attention to the traditional arguments for God's existence and the problem of speaking about God. Investigates the revelation of God in Scripture as Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Studies the classical attempts to systematize the doctrine of the Trinity.

TRS 667A: Christology

3.00 Credits

A historical and systematic study of the person and work of Jesus Christ as object and foundation of Christian faith.

TRS 692: Directed Readings

2.00 Credits

With the permission and consultation of a particular faculty member, the student draws up a list of reading materials to read throughout the semester. The faculty member will agree with the student on the manner in which the student's appropriation of the reading list should be assessed and graded.

TRS 693: Directed Research

3.00 Credits

With the permission and consultation of a particular faculty member, the student designs and implements a research project resulting in a research paper of the same scope and quality of a paper produced in a doctoral seminar course.

TRS 695: TRS Masters Intership

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 696A: S.T.L. Thesis Guidance

0.00 Credits

This course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.

TRS 696B: Master's Thesis Guidance

0.00 Credits

This course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.

TRS 698A: Licentiate Comprehensive Examination (w/Classes)

0.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 698B: Master's Comprehensive Examination (w/Classes)

0.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 698C: Baccalaureate Comprehensive Examination (w/Classes)

0.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 698D: Licentiate Comprehensive Examination (w/o Classes)

0.00 Credits

Enrollment in this course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.

TRS 698E: Master's Comprehensive Examination (w/o Classes)

0.00 Credits

Enrollment in this course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.

TRS 698F: Baccalaureate Comprehensive Examination (w/o Classes)

0.00 Credits

Enrollment in this course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.

TRS 699: Proseminar for New Master's Students

0.00 Credits

Introduction and information about theological research and resources. Students must complete a fourfold process in this course: 1. Library tour (to be completed during the student's first semester on campus); 2. Introduction to Research Methodology: access and correct scholarly use and citation of biblical, patristic, and other classical sources; 3. Research Methodology: access to and correct scholarly use and citation of modern, contemporary and electronic sources; 4. Academic style: how to properly write an academic paper. Completion of these items will be indicated on each student's tracking sheet and should be fulfilled within one academic year.

TRS 702: The Ethical Dimensions of the Prophets

3.00 Credits

"Ethical" is taken broadly to include all that relates to personal and communal response to the God of Israel as perceived by the prophets. Procedure includes investigation of the sources of prophets' ethical teaching, review of early and classical prophets, and synthesis in particular areas, including social justice and issues of war and peace.

TRS 703A: Three Covenants of Israel

3.00 Credits

The course begins with remarks on the treaty-texts of the Ancient Near East as a background for the covenantal material in the Old Testament. It then offers a detailed study of three key biblical covenants, i.e. those with Noah (Genesis 9), Abraham (Genesis 15 and 17) and with Israel at Sinai (Exodus 19-34).

TRS 703B: Messianism and Redemption

3.00 Credits

Studies the roots of messianism and redemption in Israel's experience. Surveys the development of future hope and eschatology in Israel's historical and prophetic writings and examines the transformation and fulfillment of messianic hope in the New Testament.

TRS 704: Spirituality of the Psalms

3.00 Credits

General introduction to the Psalter (principles of Hebrew poetry, literary forms of the Psalms, etc.); in-depth treatment of themes of praise, love, longing, hope, repentance, mercy, worship, as found in the Psalms, and of the concrete images in which such themes are embodied; Israel's liturgy.

TRS 705: Old Testament Prophecy

3.00 Credits

An overview of the historical and theological dimensions of Old Testament prophecy

TRS 705C: Theology of the Old Testament

3.00 Credits

After a consideration of the nature and method of Old Testament theology, the course considers some of the major theological themes of the Old Testament: revelation, the names and natures of God, eschatology, divine, creation and redemption, human beings and God, angelology, sin and forgiveness, the Decalogue and Wisdom.

TRS 707A: New Testament Christology

3.00 Credits

An examination of the Christologies found in the writings of the New Testament.

TRS 707B: New Testament Ecclesiology

3.00 Credits

An examination of the New Testament texts that contribute substantially to its various understandings of the church.

TRS 709A: New Testament Ethics

3.00 Credits

An examination of the moral teaching in the writings of the New Testament, with special attention to the Gospels and the Pauline Epistles.

TRS 709B: Human Sexuality According to the New Testament

3.00 Credits

A detailed historical-critical and literary study of the NT texts that speak of human sexuality. The significance of these for a biblically based contemporary Christian ethic will also be examined.

TRS 720A: Patristic Seminar: The Life and Thought of St. Augustine

3.00 Credits

A survey of the life of Augustine and the major controversies that helped shape his theology. Topics include the problem of evil, the holiness of the Church, grace and free will, and predestination. Students who wish to pursue further study of Augustine should take this course first.

TRS 720D: Augustine: The Confessions

3.00 Credits

'This is a course on Augustine's spiritual, intellectual, and moral autobiography. In the Confessions, Augustine tells his story in the form of various conversions (philosophical awakening, Manicheism, skepticism, neoplatonic philosophy, and Catholic Christianity). Students who wish to pursue further study of Augustine should take this course first.

TRS 720E: Augustine's Controversies

3.00 Credits

This course focuses on Augustine's major theological controversies: Manichean, Donatist, Jovinian, Pelagian, Priscillianist/Origenist, Predestinarian, Homoean, and Christological controversies.

TRS 721: Principles of Patristic Exegesis

3.00 Credits

A study of some important Latin patristic hermeneutical theories, which inform and guide biblical exegesis. Selected texts include the writings of Augustine, Jerome, Tyconius, Eucherius, Cassian, Cassiodorus, and Junillus. Focus will be on the authors' understanding of language, semiotics, communication, and the recommended hermeneutical techniques.

TRS 721A: Patristic Thought and Emotion

3.00 Credits

A consideration of the emotions in patristic thought, including such authors as Augustine, Gregory of Nyssa, Gregory of Nazianzus, Basil of Caesarea, John Cassian, and Nemesios of Emessa. Contemporary theories of emotions will also be examined.

TRS 722: Trinity, Hierarchy, and Human Society in Early Christian Thought

3.00 Credits

A study of the ways in which early Christians understood the Kingship of Christ to extend, via the mediations of hierarchies celestial and ecclesiastical, into the human politeia.

TRS 722B: The Cappadocian Theologians

3.00 Credits

The thought and culture of the Cappadocians, Basil of Caesarea, Gregory of Nazianzus, and Gregory of Nyssa, including such topics as the divine economy, neo-Arianism, and the Trinitarian controversy, Christian anthropology, the progress and dissemination of monasticism, the limits of theological language, and the reception of classical antiquity.

TRS 722C: Irenaeus and The Gnostics

3.00 Credits

An examination of the culture, historical context, and thought world of the second century theologian, Irenaeus of Lyon, including such topics as the confrontation with Valentianian Gnosticism, the interpretaiton of Scripture, eschatology, the Adam-Christ typology, the divine economy, baptism, salvation, and the spirit. The questions and directions he established for the future will also be considered.

TRS 723A: Latin Patristic Commentaries on Paul

3.00 Credits

This course focuses on the fourth century Latin commentaries of the Pauline epistles, preeminently on Ambrosiaster, and studies these in their historical and theological contexts. Special attention will be on Apostle Paul's Letter to Galatians.

TRS 723C: Topics in Greek Patristics I

3.00 Credits

Reading of selected Greek patristic authors in the original language. Permission of the instructor is required.

TRS 723D: Topics in Greek Patristics II

3.00 Credits

Reading of selected Greek patristic authors in the original language. Permission of the instructor is required.

TRS 724: The Writing of Church History

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 726A: Hilary of Poitiers De Trinitate

3.00 Credits

A study of the fourth century Trinitarian theology and controversies in light of a significant treatise of a pro-Nicene Latin theologian Hilary of Poitiers.

TRS 727: Introduction to Medieval Theology

3.00 Credits

Introduces some of the key figures of Medieval Christian theology, their texts and historical context. The course will concentrate primarily on Western figures from the ninth through the fourteenth centuries.

TRS 727A: Christian Anthropology in Patrisitc Thought

3.00 Credits

A study of the human person in the patristic world according to such major thinkers as Irenaeus, Origen, Plotinus, Gregory of Nyssa, Augustine, Nemesios of Emessa, Boethius, and Evagrius Ponticus. The soul and its relationship to body will be considered in the light of the mind-body dualism that has been attributed to Christian texts. Memory, the passions and emotions, human action, perception, and the relationship of each of these to bodily processes will also be examined in order to develop a nuanced conception of the Christian self and to reassess the predominance of the dualist model.

TRS 727B: Formation of Orthodoxy

3.00 Credits

A history of the councils from Nicaea I to Nicaea II in the light of the relationship between church and state; the role of the emperor in ecclesiastical decision-making; the extent to which ecclesiastical politics shapes the formation of heresy and orthodoxy; the making of text and tradition; and the strategies by which compliance with orthodox belief is secured. The acts of the councils, including letters, doctrinal treatises, homilies, and minutes of conciliar meetings, as well as church histories, Vitae, and imperial documents will be studied.

TRS 727C: Bonaventure, Parisian Master: Context, Texts, Interpretation

3.00 Credits

Examines the context and thought of Saint Bonaventure during his Parisian period as a student and master of theology, c. 1248 - 1257. The course will also introduce the student to the many literary forms of scholastic theology, the key figures at the University of Paris who shaped Bonaventure's mind, including Alexander of Hales, and the hermeneutical challenges of interpreting Bonaventure due to the growth of medieval studies and the nineteenth century edition of his texts.

TRS 727D: Catholic Reformation: 1400 - 1540

3.00 Credits

A study of ongoing reform efforts in the Church from the healing of the Great Western Schism to the organized Roman response to the Protestant Reformation, treating such topics as conciliarism, observantism, mysticism, popular preaching, Devotio Moderna, Christian humanism, evangelism, and the careers of major reformers.

TRS 727E: Counter Reformation: 1540 - 1615

3.00 Credits

A study of the efforts of the Roman Catholic Church to deal with the Protestant Reformation and other changes in society with particular attention to diplomatic and theological responses, religious colloquies, Council of Trent, enforcement of its decrees, index and inquisition, liturgical reforms, religious art and music, clerical education, controversialist theology, religious orders and spirituality, popular piety, missionary and uniate efforts, and confessionalization.

TRS 727F: Councils: Nicaea to Trent

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 727G: Medieval Exegesis

3.00 Credits

Studies the theory and practice of medieval exegesis from eighth to the sixteenth century through the analysis of different literary forms including but not limited to summae, sermons, the Gloss and biblical commentaries.

TRS 727H: History of Franciscan Theology

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 727I: The Holy See's Diplomacy Thru Ages

3.00 Credits

A study of the diplomacy of the Holy See throughout ages from the perspective of the papacy. Attention will be given to its history and the in-depth analysis of select diplomatic negotiations that address bilateral diplomatic relations with states, multilateral diplomacy, humanitarian assistance and Papal diplomacy and war.

TRS 727J: Theology of St. Bonaventure

3.00 Credits

The course will offer an introduction to the systematic thought of St. Bonaventure. Reading knowledge of Latin Recommended.

TRS 728A: Medieval Church History

3.00 Credits

Readings and discussions on specialized topics in medieval church history.

TRS 728B: Christian Faith and Religious Mentalities

3.00 Credits

The religious life of men and women in seventeenth- to nineteenth-century Europe as perceived through the major themes of modern historical sociology, and interpreted in the inner context of faith and spirituality. Childhood and Education; Women; Marriage and Family; Feasts and Pilgrimages; the Poor, Aging and Death.

TRS 728C: Colloquium: Council of Trent

3.00 Credits

An in-depth study through readings, papers, and discussion of select topics dealing with the background, debates, contents, interpretation, and implementation of conciliar decrees on scripture and tradition, justification, sacraments, sacrifice of the Mass, preaching, episcopal duties, the lower clergy, seminaries, religious orders, sacred art and music, the Roman Catechism, Index of Forbidden Books, Congregation of the Council, etc.

TRS 728D: Early Modern Catholicism from Trent to the French Revolution

3.00 Credits

A survey of the Catholic renewal that developed from the Council of Trent to the French revolution. Based on recent historiography it will examine the main features of this movement, its strength and weaknesses, its successes and failures, as well as Catholic resistance and alternatives that were opposed to it.

TRS 728E: Modern Catholicism from the French Revolution to Vatican II

3.00 Credits

A survey of the history of the Catholic Church, from the end of the French Revolution to the Council of Vatican II.

TRS 728F: Colloquium: From Mission Territories to Young Churches

3.00 Credits

A study of the place of missions in the life of the Catholic Church, based primarily on documents presenting the foreign missions to the European public.

TRS 728G: Models of the Church fromTrent to Vatican I

3.00 Credits

A case study of the several visions of the Catholic Church that were presented between 1563 and 1870 as alternatives to the structure resulting from the Council of Trent. Will examine the strengths and weaknesses of the "Tridentine Model," the values and limitations of the adverse proposals, as well as their validity in the wider ecclesiological tradition.

TRS 728H: Public Catholicism and the US

3.00 Credits

The course addresses Catholics' interaction with the U.S. public and the nation's political culture as related to specific social, economic, and political issues. Models or styles of Catholic activism, the public's perception of Catholics, and Catholics' relationship to other religious traditions and secular movements are explored.

TRS 728I: The Laity in American Catholic Life

3.00 Credits

Case studies of men and women activists, lay organizations, and movements with an emphasis on social thought, social action, and the evolution of lay self-understanding in the context of the development of public Catholicism ca. 1800-1950.

TRS 728J: American Catholics and Social Reform, 1875-1975

3.00 Credits

A reading course that intends to discern historical models of reform. Focuses on Catholic leaders and organizations committed to promoting a wide range of social change. Explores the religious responses to industrialism, unionism, racism, the Depression, and the civil rights and women's movements. Class discussion based on books and articles that examine the historical significance of the social encyclicals, organized Catholic charities and social work, Daniel Rudd and the Black Catholic Congress, labor and lay movements, Father John A. Ryan and the National Catholic Welfare Conference, Dorothy Day, and many other topics. Concludes with a consideration of new models of social Catholicism originating in the post-Vatican II period.

TRS 728K: Vatican II: History and Theology

3.00 Credits

This course examines the Second Vatican Council against the background of the history and tradition of the Church, especially in the 19th and early 20th centuries. We particularly consider the four movements for renewal, patristic, biblical, liturgical and ecumenical, that strongly influenced the council, some of the leading pioneers in those movements, and seven of the major texts promulgated by the council, namely the constitutions on the liturgy, revelation, the Church and the Church in the modern world, together with the documents on ecumenism, religious freedom and relations with non-christian religions. The course finally reflects on the impact and reception of the council both within the Catholic Church and beyond.

TRS 728L: Renaissance Papacy

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 728M: Catholic Education and American Culture

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 728N: Medieval Papacy

3.00 Credits

This seminar will concentrate on the history and development of the papacy from the Age of Reform in the eleventh century to the Age of Conciliarism in the fifteenth century. The pontificates of Popes Gregory VII, Alexander III, Innocent III, Innocent IV, Boniface VIII, John XXII, Martin V will receive special emphasis. The course will focus on the development of papal monarchy during this period and its effect on the structure and institutions of the Church. A final research paper will be required. There is no language requirement.

TRS 728O: Gender in American Catholic Life

3.00 Credits

The course explores the developing roles, status, influence, contributions, and tensions involving lay persons, vowed religious, and Church officials related to gender issues. The transitions in understandings of men and women from the general culture are considered along with the responses within Catholic culture with its ethnic variations, accommodations to national life, and canonical direction from Church authorities at several levels. The course uses the rapidly developing scholarly literature to address these issues from the Early Republic through the twentieth century.

TRS 728P: Evangelization in American Catholic Life

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 728Q: The Church in Latin America

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 729A: Sources of Canon Law

3.00 Credits

Readings in Gratian, the Decretals, the Glossa ordinaria, and the commentators before the Council of Trent. Explores the doctrines of canon law and the institutional norms established by canon law.

TRS 729B: History of Canon Law: Sources and Science, Selected Issues

3.00 Credits

Legal texts, church orders, Oriental collections, Dionysiana, Hispana, Pseudo-Isidorian forgeries, Decretum of Burchard, collections of Ivo of Chartres, the formation of the Corpus Iuris Canonici, developments after the Council of Trent. Church structures: the episcopate, presbyterate, patriate, papacy, councils, and the like.

TRS 730A: Virtue in Contemporary Theology

3.00 Credits

Examines the challenges posed by modernity for the concept of virtue in Christian tradition, then surveys some of the widely differing reappropriations of virtue in the current discussion: classical, communitarian, confessional, developmental, feminist, and transcendental (i.e. fundamental option theories).

TRS 730B: Moral Imagination

3.00 Credits

An inquiry into the moral dimensions of the imagination, exploring questions arising along the boundaries of ethical theory, literature, and hermeneutics. Issues include the role of narrative in morality, the social construction of agency, and relationships among virtue, character, and principle.

TRS 731A: History of Catholic Moral Theology

3.00 Credits

A survey of the history of Catholic moral theology. Topics include ethics in the early and patristic church, the rise of private auricular confession, moral syntheses of the medieval period, Trent and the Reformation, the manualist tradition and casuistry. Attention to the evolution of the discipline's self-understanding. Analysis of relationship between actions, laws, and virtues.

TRS 731C: Basic Concepts in Catholic Moral Theology

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 731D: The Sermon on the Mount and Moral Theology

3.00 Credits

St. Augustine called the Sermon on the Mount the "charter of the Christian life," a description affirmed by St. Thomas Aquinas. The purpose of this class is to explore how exactly the Sermon on the Mount has been understood in the Christian as a guide to a life of Christian discipleship. Thus the course, though rooted in Scripture, is primarily one of moral theology. Topics will include: variations in interpretation of the ethics of the Sermon throughout history, the role of Scripture in moral theology, the Scriptural warrant for a virtue approach to moral theology, and the roles of the commandments and the new law in the Christian life.

TRS 731E: The Sermon on the Mount: Exegesis and Theology

3.00 Credits

This interdisciplinary seminar addresses the following issues: The exegetical meaning of the Sermon in the context of Matthew's Gospel; How the Sermon has been interpreted in the theological tradition; The relationship between Exegesis and Moral Theology in the interpretation of the Sermon.

TRS 732A: Sexuality, the Person and Ethics

3.00 Credits

Brief examination of the contributions of sciences such as biology, genetics, ecology, psychology, and cultural anthropology to an understanding of human sexuality. This will be followed by an examination of various philosophical and theological accounts of sexuality in relation to the person and a consideration for their significance in regard to issues of gender and sexual ethics.

TRS 732B: Beginning of Life Issues

3.00 Credits

Examines issues at the beginning of life, including the moral status of the embryo, pre-natal testing, IVF and other reproductive technologies, contraception, abortion, cloning, and stem cell research. These issues will be examined in relation to contemporary attitudes in our society to and theological understandings of the place of children and childbearing.

TRS 732C: End of Life Issues

3.00 Credits

Examines key biomedical issues at the end of life and the distinctions and principles necessary for their moral evaluation. Issues analyzed will include euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide, withdrawal of life support, informed consent, relief of pain and suffering, and the determination of death.

TRS 732F: Sex and Virtue

3.00 Credits

This course offers a virtue-based approach to issues of sexual ethics, attempting to bring the contemporary revival of interest in virtue theory to bear on an understanding of sexuality, sexual flourishing, and sexual morality. The intersection of virtue theory, psychology, and sexuality will be considered.

TRS 732G: The Human Person

3.00 Credits

This course will investigate the development of the notion of "Person." The theme is relevant both to systematic and moral theology. The historical sources of the notion will be explored. Particular attention will be given to the definition of Boethius and its adoption by St. Thomas. How may we understand the "person" in the doctrine of the Trinity? This classic definition is invoked in Catholic documents dealing with the moral status of the human embryo. The structure and adequacy of these arguments will be studied. Contemporary issues will also be dealt with, for example, what is the relationship between the modern notion of "self" and that of person. What is meant by "personalism?"

TRS 733C: Topics in War and Peace

3.00 Credits

The purpose of the course is to understand the rationale and meaning of the just war tradition. In particular, we shall understand, with von Clausewitz, that the just war is an extension of politics "by other means," and not the abrogation of the political. Thus, war is a rational activity. We shall investigate this in contact with pacifism, and with ancient and current conceptions of unlimited war in the form of "holy" war.

TRS 733D: Human Rights: Religious and Ethical Perspectives

3.00 Credits

The course is an inquiry into central quandaries in the theory and practice of human rights. Topics include the conceptual character of rights language, the historical relationship of human rights to natural rights and natural law, the universality and/or relativity of human rights, the relation between religion and human rights, the problem of conflicting rights claims, and the justification of humanitarian intervention. Selected case studies will be examined.

TRS 734B: Comparative Ethics

3.00 Credits

Combines a survey of diverse religious and moral traditions with a study of methodological issues in the comparative study of ethics. Comparative strategies include sociological, anthropological, conceptual, structuralist, ecumenical, and hagiographical approaches. Traditions addressed include Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Theravada Buddhism, Hinduism, and Confucianism.

TRS 734C: Theories of Justice

3.00 Credits

Theories of Justice: A survey of influential theories of justice, from Aristotle to Rawls and his interlocutors. Special attention will be paid to Catholic social thought and current debates regarding global justice and constitutive justice.

TRS 735: Moral Issues and Moral Education

3.00 Credits

Considers specific moral issues in areas of sexuality, social justice, and bioethics within the context of Catholic moral theology. Current catechetical materials relative to these issues will be reviewed and critiqued. Faculty. (Previously REL 708)

TRS 735A: Pastoral Ethics

3.00 Credits

This seminar offers students the opportunity to reflect on their ministerial experience in conversation with ethical resources from both the theological and secular world. These resources include foundational ideas in Christian ethics, including Catholic moral theology, as well as classic Western philosophical theories. They also include concrete case studies and the contemporary discussion of professional ethics considered in relation to ministerial practice. In the process, we will examine the often complex issues that arise during the practical tasks of Christian love.

TRS 736A: Fundamental Moral Theology of the Gift

3.00 Credits

The course offers an approach to moral theology of which the fundamental framework is the "Gift." It draws on contemporary philosophy and theology of the Gift (Derrida, Marion, Bruaire) as well as classic sources such as St. Thomas Aquinas.

TRS 737: The Body inTheology

3.00 Credits

This course surveys theological reflection concerning the significance of the body' its relation to the person, and its sexual dimension in the Christian tradition. Select patristic, medieval, and modern sources will guide the examination of both continuity and development in thought concerning the body.

TRS 737A: Ethics and Action

3.00 Credits

A seminar in methodology in moral theology, focusing on the nature of human action. Covers questions concerning human ends, practical rationality, choice, intention, object, and the relationship between these and questions of the self and narrative. Readings drawn from classical and contemporary commentators and theorists.

TRS 737B: The Virtues

3.00 Credits

Examines the challenges posed by modernity for the concept of virtue in the Christian tradition. This seminar explores selected ancient, patristic, and medieval treatments of the virtues, then surveys some of the widely differing re-appropriations of virtue in the current discussion: classical, communitarian, confessional, developmental, feminist, and transcendental (i.e. fundamental option theories).

TRS 737C: Law in Moral Theology

3.00 Credits

Part of the history of western philosophy is the periodic declaration of the death of the natural law, but as one commentator noticed, the natural law always "has risen livelier than ever and buried its undertakers." What some see as a weakness-the multiple forms of the natural law-others acknowledge as the genius of the system. Explores how the natural law may be newly justified in our age, a task made urgent by the fact that Western, and increasingly, global, culture presupposes the existence in law of a system of "natural" or human rights.

TRS 737D: Twentieth-Century Theological Ethics (MT/E Core #4)

3.00 Credits

Part I of the course will present an historical, critical study of Christian ethics (Moral Theology) in the Catholic tradition. Topics will be: the moral theology manuals; the renewal of moral theology in the light of Vatican II; the new accounts of Thomistic moral theology; situationism and the problem of relativism; the meaning of "objective" in ethics; "physicalism;" the "New natural law" theory and its critics; proportionalism and its critics; personalist ethics; the ethics of "Gift." Part II of the course will study Christian ethics in other traditions; in particular the ethics of Karl Barth and Stanley Hauerwas. In the sphere of secular ethics, "discourse ethics' and procedural ethics will be explained and critiqued. Finally the search for a "common ethics" will be discussed.

TRS 737E: Freedom, Law, Rights (MT/E Core #3)

3.00 Credits

This course will examine the importance of early modern/modern ideas as a source for contemporary reflection on human freedom and human rights. Attention will be devoted to certain key concepts or themes in order to organize and trace the impact of these ideas on the Christian moral tradition and identify their relevance for current theological, ethical, and political discussions. Among the key concepts and themes that may be considered are: natural rights, political sovereignty, ecclesiastical authority, conscience, and just war.

TRS 738: Ethics and The Environment

3.00 Credits

To be human is to be `placed' in the world, both in a `natural' and `built' environment. Our vision of what it means to be human shapes what we build, especially in relation to the natural environment. Our buildings, from the humblest shack to the grandest Cathedral, make moral statements. This course surveys historical and contemporary theories of how humans are to build, whether it be, e.g. homes, cities, monuments, or churches.

TRS 740: Liturgical Sources

3.00 Credits

A study of liturgical sources with attention to historical and theological method. Particular but not exclusive focus on sources of Western churches. Working knowledge of Latin required.

TRS 741A: Liturgy: Theological and Historical Perspectives

3.00 Credits

Theological, historical, and cultural considerations affecting the development of the traditions of public worship, East and West. An evaluation of the significance of these issues for the late twentieth century renewal of liturgical traditions.

TRS 741B: Liturgy and Culture

3.00 Credits

An investigation of the relationship between liturgy and culture from anthropological and theological perspectives. Topics include contemporary notions of culture, symbols and rituals as mediators of culture, liturgy as the symbolic, ritual action of local churches, issues which have emerged in the reception of Vatican II.

TRS 741C: The Ritual Event

3.00 Credits

Ritual is a central category for the study of religion, culture, and worship. In this course we will explore a variety of theories for understanding the nature of ritual action. We will also study several approaches to interpreting the ritual event.

TRS 742A: The Liturgical Year

3.00 Credits

Liturgical theology of the annual celebration of major feasts and seasons of the church year in history and in the present reform. Attention to ecumenical comparisons as well as to catechesis, spirituality, and pastoral practice.

TRS 742B: Liturgy of Hours and Community Prayer

3.00 Credits

Theological foundations for Christian communal prayer. The historical and theological dimensions of the monastic and cathedral offices and popular forms of common prayer. Investigation and critique of the Roman Liturgy of the Hours and other models of contemporary community prayer.

TRS 743A: Liturgical Catechesis

3.00 Credits

Course focuses on the liturgy as a source of catechesis. Emphasis is placed on the mystagogy of the sacraments of initiation and other selected sacramental and liturgical rites.

TRS 743C: RCIA: Theological, Ecumenical, and Pastoral Perspectives

3.00 Credits

A study of the RCIA with a view to understanding its theological foundations and implications. This will include a discussion of the ecumenical implications of its adaptation for admitting baptized Christians to full communion.

TRS 743D: Reconciliation and Anointing of the Sick

3.00 Credits

Study of the historical development of the sacraments of reconciliation and anointing of the sick with emphasis on the theological and pastoral implications of the tradition.

TRS 743E: Liturgies of Christian Marriage

3.00 Credits

A study of the scriptural origins, patristic enrichment, medieval development, Tridentine codification, and recent reform of the rites of marriage. Exploration of developments in both the Eastern and Western traditions. Foundations of a liturgical theology of marriage.

TRS 743F: Sacramental Theology and Liturgical Participation

3.00 Credits

An exploration of the correlation between Catholic sacramental theology and the liturgical vision of "full, conscious, and active participation." After a lecture format introduction, the majority of class sessions will be seminar format, some led by students, where various questions will be explored from the assigned readings. A major focus of the discussions will center on the pastoral implications of how one's understanding of the Catholic principle of sacramentality influences one's understanding of the essence of liturgical action, and what that means in the actual celebrations of parish Sunday Eucharist and other sacramental liturgies.

TRS 743G: Contemporary Liturgical Issues

3.00 Credits

The course will study a number of liturgical issues that impact contemporary pastoral life. It will treat the history, the present context, the challenges and opportunities presented by each issue. Topics include: recent theological writing on Christian sacrifice and its impact on Eucharistic spirituality and practice; the translation of the third edition of the Roman Missal; an updated look at contemporary Americans' (in)capacity to celebrate liturgy; devotions: Eucharistic and non-Eucharistic; multicultural parishes; preaching and liturgical enactment; the liturgy and ongoing catechesis for adults and children; the RCIA; architecture and art for worship; liturgical music; ecumenical issues. There will be some opportunity for student-generated topics.

TRS 743H: Sacramental Celebration as Pastoral Care

3.00 Credits

In the Catholic tradition worship and pastoral care are integral to each other. In closely considering the sweep of sacramental practice on the model of the RCIA, we see: the pastoral necessity of discernment: authentic sacramental action as holistically addressing the individual and the community and their mutual ministerial relationship in and through the "ordo" which is both an ensemble of rites and a sacramental way of living.

TRS 744: Eucharist: A Liturgical Theology

3.00 Credits

Based on liturgical sources in early, medieval, reformed, as well as contemporary worship. These will be placed in their relation to social and cultural patterns.

TRS 744A: Death and Dying: A Liturgical Theology

3.00 Credits

The foundations of a liturgical theology of Christian death and dying developed by exploring the texts and contexts of the rites of the Church both East and West.

TRS 746: The Roman Missal

3.00 Credits

Evolution of the missal as a liturgical book. Postconciliar Missale Romanum 1970 and 2002 assessed with particular attention to liturgical structures, texts and translations. Evaluation of present revised missals now in use (e.g., Spanish, French, German, Italian and Ambrosian) especially in relation to the proposed ICEL Roman Missal translations as well as comparison with service books of other Christian churches.

TRS 747: Liturgical Spirituality: Christian Ritual and Transformation

3.00 Credits

Explores the dynamic between liturgical and personal spiritualities by engaging in critical reflection on the role of liturgy as mediator of conversion. Liturgy is studied as symbolic, ritual action and conversion as a process of transformation which is personal and social. Particular attention to initiation and eucharist.

TRS 747A: The Cult of Saints in Liturgical Practice

3.00 Credits

History of the rise of a Christian cult of the saints: martyrs, bishops, and confessors. The medieval expansion of the liturgical devotion to saints in East and West. The liturgical celebration of the saints today. A liturgical theology and spirituality of the saints.

TRS 748A: Byzantine Divine Liturgy

3.00 Credits

This historical study of the development of the Byzantine Liturgy analyzes the constitutive elements in order to understand their present form. It will address issues of cathedral and monastic influence. This historical study will conclude in an articulation of Byzantine liturgical theology.

TRS 749: The Holy Spirit in Liturgical Celebration

3.00 Credits

A theological study of the operation of the Holy Spirit in Christian liturgy based on the liturgical texts and rites of both East and West. Special attention will be given to the Eucharist and Initiation.

TRS 750A: Classics in Christian Spirituality I

3.00 Credits

Critical reading and discussion of classic texts from the second to the thirteenth centuries. Included will be works by such authors as some of the Apostolic Fathers, early monastic authors, Origen, Gregory of Nyssa, Pseudo-Dionysius, Augustine, Hildegard of Bingen, and Francis and Clare of Assisi.

TRS 750B: Classics in Christian Spirituality II

3.00 Credits

Similar in format to Classics I, this course focuses on the classic texts in Western Christian spirituality from the fourteenth to the twentieth centuries. Included will be works by such authors as Eckhart, Ruusbroec, Julian of Norwich, Martin Luther, Teresa of Avila, John of the Cross, Ignatius of Loyola, John Wesley, Jonathan Edwards, Therese of Lisieux, and Thomas Merton.

TRS 750C: Major Authors in Christian Spirituality

3.00 Credits

This course will focus on writings by six important authors in the Christian spiritual tradition: two from the patristic era (Origen and Augustine), two from the medieval period (Meister Eckhart and Julian of Norwich), one from the early modern period (Teresa of Avila) and one from recent times (Thomas Merton).

TRS 750D: Cultivation of Peace in World's Spiritual Traditions

3.00 Credits

An examination of what major thinkers in various traditions have taught about the cultivation of peace: peace with self, with one's local and global society, and with God. Readings will be drawn from a number of traditions, such as Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Daoism, and the Baha'i Faith. Religious peacemaking efforts between Israelis and Palestinians will be among the topics studied.

TRS 750E: The Book of Revelation: Text and Reception

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 750F: Visualizing the Gospels: The Gospels in Art

3.00 Credits

This course examines the contribution of visual artists as interpreters of the Gospels, drawing on the concept of `visual exegesis' to complement more traditional methods of gospel study. A range of artists and artworks from different periods and cultural contexts will be considered (including interpretations of key Gospel scenes such as the Nativity, the Baptism of Christ, the Sermon on the Mount and the Passion and Resurrection).

TRS 751B: History and Theory of Catechetics I

3.00 Credits

Examines selections from patristic and medieval writers on sacramental and moral catechesis that illustrate the assertion in the Catechism of the Catholic Church: "Quite early on, the name catechesis was given to the totality of the Church's efforts to make disciples ... and to educate and instruct them in this life, thus building up the body of Christ." (n.4)

TRS 751C: History and Theory of Catechetics II

3.00 Credits

Readings in selected works of Bushnell, Coe, Jungmann, and contemporary writers in the fields of catechetics and religious education. Discussion of the nature and processes of religious development and socialization and the relationship of catechetics and theology. Faculty.

TRS 751D: Issues in Religious Education and Catechetics

3.00 Credits

Selected issues in current pastoral practice with attention to relevant documents, historical background, contemporary culture, and future implications.

TRS 751E: Pastoral Sacramental Issues

3.00 Credits

Focus is on questions connected with initiation and other sacraments, preparation programs for sacraments, Sunday celebrations in the absence of a priest, communion services and other contemporary pastoral issues.

TRS 751F: Foundations of Religious Education/Catechetics

3.00 Credits

An overview of the history of catechesis in order to provide perspective on current developments. An introduction to the authors and sources in the field of catechetics/religious education.

TRS 751G: The Bible in Liturgy, Preaching and Spiritual Formation

3.00 Credits

The Bible as the church's book. Emergence of the New Testament writings, formation of the biblical canon as ecclesial events. Lectionary as "canon within the canon"; lectionary preaching, the liturgical homily; liturgical catechesis and mystagogy. Contemporary issues and critiques.

TRS 751H: Trinitarian Catechesis & Baptismal Creed

3.00 Credits

An in-depth study of the "economic Trinity" as presented in the Catechism of the Catholic Church and the Baptismal Creed as the centerpiece in adult catechesis.

TRS 751I: Adult Faith Formation

3.00 Credits

This course explores the historical, theological, developmental, social and cultural dimension of adult faith formation from within the framework of the Christian community. Following the spirit of Our Hearts Were Burning: A Pastoral Plan for Adult Faith Formation in the United States, students identify resources for organizing, planning and evaluating sound faith formation programs for adults.

TRS 751K: Youth and Young Adults: Mentoring and Ministry

3.00 Credits

This course explores various elements of mentoring and ministry with adolescents and young adults from within the framework of USCCB documents, Renewing the Vision and Sons and Daughters of the Light.

TRS 751L: Jesus the Teacher: Parables, Proverbs & Metaphors

3.00 Credits

The Scripture will explore Jesus' teachings in his pedagogical modes and methods as found in the three synoptic gospels and as placed on his lips by the evangelist John to expound the Church's faith in him. The course will be working from the texts and the Sayings Gospel of Thomas, with assistance from the works of Jeremias Davies, Lambrecht and Perrin on the question.

TRS 751M: Catechesis and Evangelization

3.00 Credits

This course will explore the inter-relationship between the Church's ministries of evangelization and catechesis. Using Paul VI's apostolic exhortation evangelii nuntiandi as a point of departure, the course will involve a careful study of universal and national church documents that have shaped the contemporary Church's increasing awareness and direction for faith formation and missionary activity. Various authors will be consulted to surface relative issues, conflicts and agendas pursuant to where do we go from here?

TRS 752: Spirituality and Religion in a Scientific Age

3.00 Credits

Examines the effects of modern scientific and technological culture on the tradition of Christian spirituality and doctrine and the way in which leading theologians and spiritual writers have responded to the challenges and opportunities presented by that culture.

TRS 752A: Christian Spirituality: A Global View

3.00 Credits

This course will provide an overview of the Christian spiritual tradition, including developments in recent centuries in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. In addition to a basic textbook, readings will include books by authors prominent in the field of interfaith spirituality (e.g., Bede Griffiths), feminist spirituality (Sandra Schneiders), liberation spirituality (Gustavo Gutierrez), African spirituality (Desmond Tutu), and contemplative spirituality (Thomas Merton).

TRS 752B: Spirituality, Religion and Social Transformation

3.00 Credits

An examination of ways in which some major spiritual and religious authors have addressed issues of slavery, global poverty, environmental degradation, and ethnic violence. Readings will be drawn from books and articles by such authors as John Woolman, Hans Kung, Stephanie Kaza, Patricia Mische, Marc Gopin, John Paul Lederach, and Pope John Paul II.

TRS 752C: Marriage and Family Ministry

3.00 Credits

Respecting the rich life experience and ministerial experience of the participants, the professor collaborates with the other learners to create a learning environment that is conducive to the integration of theological and pastoral knowledge for the purpose of effective ministry. The three main trajectories of learning will entail the exploration of the concept of Christian marriage and family as ecclesia domestica, the application of the criterion of "family perspective" to the pastoral arenas of the participants, and the study of select controversial issues encountered by today's ministers.

TRS 752D: Death and Dying: Bereavement

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 753A: Dialogue Between Theology and Psychology

3.00 Credits

An examination of the evolving dialogue between theology and psychology, the theological uses of psychology, and prospects for the future of the dialogue. Implications for contemporary theological reflection and pastoral practice also will be considered.

TRS 753B: Faith Development / Conversion

3.00 Credits

Examines various issues in contemporary approaches to conversion, leading to understanding of how we can conceive of conversion today in a post-Enlightenment worldview, including (1) faith as emerging through different life stages, (2) human persons as "socially located" in diverse communities of meaning, and (3) social sin and conversion as well as individual transformation. Readings include social scientific studies of conversion, literature on faith development as well as articles on theologies of conversion in Protestant and Roman Catholic traditions. May also include various autobiographies and/or conversion and slave religion in the nineteenth century.

TRS 753C: Psychological and Faith Development

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 753D: Spiritual Practices

3.00 Credits

This course will investigate some traditional spiritual practices as a means of shaping and forming a religious and virtuous self. Contributions of Michel Foucault, Michel de Certeau, Talal Assad, and others on the important role of spiritual practices will provide a theoretical perspective. Hospitality, forgiveness, fasting, lectio divina, confession, celibacy, and spiritual direction are among the practices to be examined.

TRS 753E: Personality and Religious Development

3.00 Credits

Examines the psychological foundations of religion in human development and the evolution of religion during the life cycle. An investigation of the contributions of Erikson, the object-relations theorists, Piaget, Kohlberg, Fowler, and adult developmental theorists. Implications of developmental psychology for religious education and spirituality are emphasized.

TRS 754: Mystical Theology

3.00 Credits

An introduction to the study of mysticism. Issues include the relationship of mystical experience and doctrine, the cross-cultural study of mysticism, and an analysis of various philosophical, theological, natural, and social scientific methods employed in the study of mysticism.

TRS 754B: Mystical Theology: Three Pivotal Texts of Bonaventure

3.00 Credits

An examination of the foundations of Christian Mysticism through the lens of Bonaventure's 'summa mistica,' Itinerarium Mentis in Deum, De Triplici Via, and Soliloquium. Each of these texts relies on the writings of the earlier Christian tradition, especially those of Augustine, the Pseudo-Dionysius, Bernard of Clairvaux, the Victorines, and Francis of Assisi. Furthermore the first two of these texts influenced the subsequent tradition of mysticism. In order to grow sensitive to the nuances of these texts, a part of each class will be devoted to translation of a select Latin passage.

TRS 754C: Medieval Commentaries on the Song of Songs: The Cistercians

3.00 Credits

An examination of the Medieval Commentaries on the Song of Songs that Bernard of Clairvaux placed at the heart of his understanding of the Cistercian Reform. The course will examine the commentary of Origen that became the basis of Bernard's approach, Bernard's own commentaries, and those of William of St. Thierrey, Gilbert of Hoyland, and John of Ford.

TRS 754D: The Franciscan Tradition of Spirituality

3.00 Credits

This course examines the Franciscan theological tradition in its historical context through the use of different genres of texts. Figures to be explored include: Francis, Clare, Alexander of Hales, Bonaventure, Peter of John Olivi, Scotus, Ockham.

TRS 754E: Medieval English Spirituality

3.00 Credits

An examination of the works of the following authors, studied in their historical context: Richard Rolle, Walter Hilton, Julian of Norwich, the author of The Cloud of Unknowing, and Margery Kempe.

TRS 754F: The Carmelite Tradition

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 754G: Franciscan Masters of Prayer

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 754H: THE CARMELITE TRADITION (CARMEL SINCE 1500)

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 754J: 12th Century Mystical Theology

3.00 Credits

This course will be a survey of and introduction to the most important mystical works and thinkers of the twelfth century, from the Cistercians (Bernard of Clairvaux, William of St. Thierry, Aelred of Rievaulx) to the visionaries (Hildegard of Bingen, Joachim of Fiore, etc.) to the Victorines (Hugh and Richard of St. Victor). Reading important works of each, we shall situate their thought in the context of the tremendous renewal that characterized twelfth-century life and institutions.

TRS 755: Method in Christian Spirituality

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 755A: Hispanic/Latino Theology

3.00 Credits

Historical and cultural aspects of the Hispanic/Latino community in the United States. The development of Hispanic/Latino theology in the North American context by representative theologians (Aquino, De La Torre, Elizondo, Espín, Díaz, Goizueta, Isasi-Díaz, Pedraja, et al.).

TRS 755C: Spirit and Letter: Biblical Interpretation in the Early and Eastern Christianity

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 755D: Spiritual Themes in Early Christianity

3.00 Credits

One of the most prominent themes in early Christian spiritual teaching was the pilgrimage of the soul. The goal of ascending to the divine dwelling-place appears already in scriptural commentaries such as those of Origen; in the interpretation of journeys to Jerusalem; and in accounts of the divine theophany to Abraham, Moses and others. This course explores early Christian discussions of the ascent of the mind, drawing upon both philosophical and scriptural sources, particularly as found in Origen, Augustine, Gregory of Nyssa, and several monastic authors.

TRS 756: Pastoral Approach to Adult Spiritual Formation

3.00 Credits

Using a participative approach, this course examines the characteristics of adult learning and explores the use of Scriptures, spiritual classics, methods of prayer, and spiritual direction in ongoing adult formation.

TRS 756B: Catholic Social Teaching in Religious Education

3.00 Credits

This course examines the historical development and current state of Catholic social thought with attention to key papal, conciliar and episcopal documents for the purpose of understanding their relationship to and enhancement of Catholic higher education, religious education and parish ministries. Methods of social analysis and theological reflection will be considered as well as current trends in service learning programs. Additionally, opportunities for exploring and creating innovative approaches to sharing CST at all levels of education are offered.

TRS 757: Interfaith Spirituality

3.00 Credits

Examines the sometimes controversial ways in which the understanding and practice of Christian spirituality has been affected by currents coming from other religious traditions. Readings will be drawn from ecclesial documents and from authors such as Thomas Merton, Bede Griffiths, Sara Grant, Raimon Panikkar, Diana Eck, and William Johnston.

TRS 758: The Formation of Christian Martyrdom

3.00 Credits

The early Christian understanding of martyrdom appeared in the second century and deepened quickly in nascent Christian communities. This course examines the earliest works -- from the first through the early fourth century, and in differing cultures -- to portray the sufferings and triumphs of Christian "witnesses" in conflict with the imperial regime of Rome. It considers the influence of earlier literary genres (letters, biographies, and other documentary sources) in the development of an ideal Christian spiritual life and death in imitation of the passion of Christ, visible in accounts of women and men alike. The class will read primary sources and recent scholarly discussions.

TRS 760A: Theological Foundations

3.00 Credits

An introduction to the practice of Christian theology as human performance. Key moments in the genesis of theology as a discipline; its foundations, tasks, and purpose. Faculty.

TRS 760B: Theology, Culture and Hermeneutic

3.00 Credits

Starting with theories about reading texts, the course explores how contemporary theologians appropriate hermeneutical approaches, deconstructive and reconstructive, to Christian tradition in relation to questions that arise from cultural settings and cultural transitions. This includes the study of writings on reading texts chosen from authors such as Booth, Greimas and Iser, on hermeneutical appropriation chosen from authors such as Caputo, Gadamer, Habermas, Ricoeur and Vattimo, and on theological hermeneutics chosen from authors such as Chopp, Milbank, Lafont, Mveng, Pieris, Elisabeth Schüssler Fiorenza, Tracy and Von Balthasar.

TRS 760C: Theology, Culture, and Language

3.00 Credits

Christian theology has always attended to the significance of language, and its ability to refer truly to God. Augustine, Pseudo-Dionysius, and Aquinas are examined before turning to Wittgenstein's influence upon modern Thomists, with consequences for the relation of Church and culture.

TRS 761B: Theological Anthropology in Cross-Cultural Perspective

3.00 Credits

This course explores the issues raised by and for theological anthropology in cross-cultural perspective. It aims to examine, critique, and enlarge Christian anthropologies in light of the emerging world church, of developments in cultural and indigenous psychologies, and of post-colonial critiques. It gives participants an opportunity to explore issues in their own theological anthropologies

TRS 761C: Trinitarian Theology Today

3.00 Credits

The course offers a system of coordinates to deal with the increasing number of Trinitarian Theologies developed after the Second Vatican Council. The focus is to systematize the different approaches found in contemporary Trinitarian Theology and to reveal the hidden agendas in the discussion of the central phrases of the doctrine.

TRS 761D: Character of God

3.00 Credits

Studies the differences between classical and contemporary treatments of the divine attributes and character. In dialogue with feminist theology and process thought, investigates questions concerning how God is appropriately named, and whether God changes or suffers, in an approach which affirms both the transcendence and immanence of God.

TRS 761E: New Atheism and the Christian God

3.00 Credits

Dawkins, Harris, Dennett and others have recently accused religious beliefs of being unjustified and illusionary. Their attack questions the value of religion in general and the monotheistic concept of God. The course is meant to discuss the challenges coming from New Atheism and to explore the deeper sides of the Christian concept of God. Along the lines it will be necessary to deal with a Christian response to evolution, intelligent design, religious diversity, religiously motivated violence and the problem of superstition.

TRS 761F: Thomas Aquinas on the Triune God

3.00 Credits

Studies Aquinas' theology of the Triune God, looking particularly at QQ. 2-43 of the Prima pars of the Summa theologiae. Attention will also be given to contemporary scholarship on Aquinas.

TRS 761G: Aquinas on the Emotions

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 762: Victorine Theology

3.00 Credits

This course will be a survey of and introduction to one or more of the multi-faceted theological projects of the Victorines (Andrew, Hugh, Richard, etc.): biblical; mystical; systematic. We will choose one or more of the principal works of the Victorine theologians to study closely, situating their work within the broader context of the rapidly-evolving theology of the twelfth century.

TRS 763A: Soteriology

3.00 Credits

The soteriological theme: Christ's "work" and its effect. Scriptural data and patristic elaboration of biblical imagery. Anselm, satisfaction, and the Thomist synthesis. The modern problematic, Lonergan, and the Law of the Cross.

TRS 763C: Divine Impassibility and Human Suffering

3.00 Credits

The course examines the question of whether God suffers and, if so, in what way does God's suffering touch human suffering. Students will read patristic and medieval debates about patripassianism and divine impassibility to assist a critical analysis of 20th-century doctrinal debates on the topic.

TRS 763D: Original Sin

3.00 Credits

Considers the doctrine of original sin in its origins, historical development, and contemporary formulations. Covers patristic thought (with special attention to Augustine), high medieval discussions (with special attention to Thomas Aquinas), the Protestant Reformation, and the Council of Trent, and then turns to contemporary attempts at a synthesis

TRS 763E: Theology of Grace

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 764A: The Local Church

3.00 Credits

The local or particular Church from historical, systematic, ecumenical, and pastoral perspectives. Use of Vatican II. The local Church and the universal Church, the Eucharist, the local Church of Rome, the theology of the parish as related to the local Church. Seminar format: lecture and discussion.

TRS 764B: The Church as Communion

3.00 Credits

A study of the important concept of koinonia/communio: scriptural and historical background and ecclesiological application: communion of saints, local/universal Church, catholicity, collegiality, communication, and current ecumenical dialogues. Format: lecture and discussion.

TRS 764C: The Church as Gift and Task

3.00 Credits

Reflections in view of a critical systematic theology: method in ecclesiology; ecclesiology and social theory; the divine and the human in the Church; the Church as effect and instrument of salvation.

TRS 764D: The Church as Catholic and Global

3.00 Credits

This course examines the shape of catholicity in a Church increasingly aware of its local and global character. Topics include: Vatican II as the emergence of a 'World Church,' the relationship of evangelization and inculturation, and Christianity's enduring Greco-Roman-European heritage.

TRS 765A: History and Theology of the Ecumenical Movement

3.00 Credits

A historical and theological analysis of the modern ecumenical movement, from its origins in the early twentieth century through today, with emphasis on the World Council of Churches, theological discussions in the Faith and Order Commission (e.g., Baptism, Eucharist and Ministry), and church union discussions in the US and elsewhere. The engagement of the Catholic Church with the ecumenical movement will be examined.

TRS 765B: Ecumenical Theology

3.00 Credits

In the course of the twentieth century, the unity and disunity of Christians emerged as a major theme within theology. This course will explore the nature of ecumenical theology and its major themes (the unity of the Church, doctrinal consensus, individual doctrinal issues that have been `church-dividing'). Works by individual theologians (e.g., Yves Congar, George Lindbeck) and texts from ecumenical dialogues (e.g., the Joint Declaration on the Doctrine of Justification) will be examined.

TRS 766B: Introduction to Eastern Orthodox Theology

3.00 Credits

The Orthodox Church plays an important role in the ecumenical movement, not least through the impact of its own distinctive theology on the western churches. Eastern Orthodox theology builds upon the Greek Fathers and the Byzantine tradition. Yet, the 20th century has experienced a certain renewal of orthodox theology, due not least to Russian exile theologians. This course surveys main themes of today's orthodox theology and introduces authors like Lossky, Meyendorff, Staniloae and Zizioulas.

TRS 766C: Catholic/Orthodox Dialogue

3.00 Credits

Catholic-Orthodox relations entered a new phase with the lifting in 1965 of the mutual anathemas dating back to 1054, which precipitated the great schism. Recent decades have subsequently seen a concerted effort at reconciliation by means of a dialogue of charity and a dialogue of truth. This course examines the strategy and major achievements of this dialogue, particularly the agreed statements that have been reached by the international and the north American theological dialogue commissions, respectively. It also considers the problems that have arisen and the issues still outstanding on the path towards the restoration of full eucharistic communion.

TRS 768: Theology of Liberation

3.00 Credits

Origins, main themes, and critique of liberation theology. Readings from Gutierrez, Segundo, Boff, Freire, Cone. Discussion and pastoral application of several issues: theological, socioeconomic, racial, political, feminist. Format: lecture and discussion.

TRS 769A: Crucifixion of Jesus in Contemporary Theology

3.00 Credits

A study of the interpretation of the theological significance of the crucifixion of Jesus, by major contemporary theologians, including Hans Urs von Balthasar, Jurgen Moltmann, Karl Rahner, Edward Schillebeeckx, and Raymund Schwager.

TRS 769B: The Resurrection of Jesus in Contemporary Theology

3.00 Credits

A study of the treatment of Jesus' resurrection by major contemporary exegetes and systematic theologians, including Gerd Ludemann, Wolfhart Pannenberg, Rudolf Pesch, Karl Rahner, and Edward Schillebeeckx.

TRS 769D: Two Contemporary Christologies

3.00 Credits

A study of the recent Christological writings of Roger Haight and Raymund Schwager.

TRS 769E: Christology and Cultures

3.00 Credits

The course aims to assess Christological movements in the world church and to evaluate critically the development of christologies within cultural processes.

TRS 769F: Jesus in Historical Perspective

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 770A: Contemporary Theological Methods

3.00 Credits

Historical survey outlining the development and differences of the basic categories, methods, criteria, and notions of theology throughout the history of Christian thought.

TRS 770B: Spiritual Theology of John Henry Newman

3.00 Credits

This seminar traces Newman's spiritual journey as described in his Apologia Pro Vita Sua and examine his spiritual theology as presented in his sermons, conferences, and correspondence. Students enrolled in the seminar are expected to prepare and present a research paper on one aspect of Newman's spirituality.

TRS 770C: Theology of Karl Rahner

3.00 Credits

Examines the theological method and basic ideas of Karl Rahner (1904-1984). Particular attention to his metaphysics of knowledge and transcendental anthropology as well as to his teachings on God, Christ, church, sacraments, and eschatology.

TRS 770D: Theology Hans Urs Von Balthasar

3.00 Credits

An introduction to von Balthasar's approach to systematic theology, drawing equally from his theological aesthetics, theo-drama, and theo-logic.

TRS 770G: Political Theology

3.00 Credits

An examination of key thinkers in political theology, attending to the modern transformation of medieval political theology through key theological topoi such as creation, natural law, corpus mysticum and the supernatural, secular time and eschatology.

TRS 770R: Theology of Joseph Ratzinger

3.00 Credits

Explores the theology of Joseph Ratzinger as professor, prefect, and pope. Topics include: theological method, christology, ecclesiology, eschatology, liturgy, Vatican II, and modernity.

TRS 771: The Theology of Bernard Lonergan

3.00 Credits

Lonergan's understanding of the contemporary theological task, the non-foundationalist foundations on which the performance of that task rests, and the collaborative mtethod those foundations generate.

TRS 772: Aquinas and Bonaventure

3.00 Credits

Bonaventure and Aquinas were critical to their own period and their writings remain essential sources for contemporary theologians. This course compares Bonaventure and Aquinas on key theological themes (Trinity, Christology, Anthropology and others), across various literary genres with a view to both historical and systematic understanding of their theological thought

TRS 780A: Introduction to the Study of Religion

3.00 Credits

This course is intended to provide a foundation for further graduate studies in religion by acquainting students with theories and methods from a variety of historical and social-scientific approaches, as well as with issues relating to their application in research. Topics include the development of the discipline of religious studies, anthropology of religion, psychology of religion, sociology of religion, and others. Faculty

TRS 780B: Hermeneutics and Religion

3.00 Credits

Through lectures, audiovisual presentations, and discussions, religious forms (e.g., prayer, metaphors, narrative, and law) and interpreters (e.g., Bal, Bultmann, Gadamer, Habermas, Ricoeur, Said, Tracy, and others) will be studied.

TRS 781A: Mission in the World Church

3.00 Credits

As Christianity has made its way into many cultures and regions of the world, the critical study of the cross cultural process of Christianity and its accompanying theologies of mission are of great interest for future reflection on cross-cultural communication and appropriation of Christian faith. The course examines various stages in Christianity's cross cultural history, studies significant changes in theologies of mission and inculturation, and explores recent proposals of cross-cultural theology for to reclaim mission in the World Church of today.

TRS 781B: Models and Methods in Comparative Theology

3.00 Credits

This course aims to (1) outline the fundamentals of the emerging discipline of Comparative Theology by (2) employing various historical and systematic models as hermeneutical tools by which to (3) reconstruct and interpret historical and systematic theological case studies as background against which to (4) appreciate the importance of the larger world religious scene as the context in which Christian theologians must learn to do their work in this century.

TRS 782B: Interreligious Dialogue

3.00 Credits

This course examines the nature and history of interreligious dialogue and ways it is being conducted today on the local, national, and international levels. Topics include theological and sociological perspectives on religious diversity and cultural developments influencing interreligious dialogue. Students will study representative works by persons active in such dialogue.

TRS 782C: Dialogue Between Christians and Jews

3.00 Credits

Modern Jews seek dialogue with Christians concerning sociological and political but not religious matters; Christians think religious dialogue should be easy because the religious traditions share the first Testament. Studies the outreach and repentance of the churches, together with the priority of personal contact over documentary interaction.

TRS 782D: Practical Issues Between Muslims and Christians

3.00 Credits

An examination of three areas of shared concern between Muslim and Christian communities in the United States: 1) spiritual resources in the respective traditions to sustain individual believers during their transitions from birth through maturity to death; 2) authority and responsibility of leaders in the respective communities of believers; 3) relations of the community of believers to society at large, including participating in civic life and bearing witness. Enrollment is open to Christians, Muslims, and others. In a setting of free inquiry, mutual respect, and honest exchange between instructors and students, the course studies and compares Muslim and Christian practices.

TRS 782E: Encounters between the Abrahamic Religions

3.00 Credits

In this course we will discuss some of the most important theological topics in the encounters between adherents of the Abrahamic religions, both in the Medieval and in the contemporary period. The topics will include dialogues and polemics about the nature and the properties of God; creation; the status and role of human beings; revelation and the Word of God; role and function of prophets; and the limits of human language about God. We will try to do justice to the Scriptural, the theological and the mystical traditions of the three Abrahamic religions: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

TRS 783: Theology and Science

3.00 Credits

Examines the interaction of these two disciplines, including their cooperative and contentious history, philosophical foundations, methods, and worldviews. Studies such specific issues as the cosmological argument and evolution, with the goal of understanding how these two forms of scholarship are autonomous yet interrelated.

TRS 784: Religion and Modern American Society

3.00 Credits

Examines religious and spiritual dynamics in post-World War II American society. Topics covered include religion and therapeutic culture; the decline of mainline religion; the rise of the Charismatic Movement, the New Religious Right, the New Age Movement; the "spiritual seeker" syndrome; the mega-Church phenomenon; religious pluralism; and the success of "new paradigm" and evangelical churches.

TRS 784A: Understanding Fundamentalism and "Strong" Religion

3.00 Credits

This course explores characteristics of 'strong religion', its relationship to fundamentalism, to religious organizational vitality, and to other forms of religious identity. The class is organized thematically around 'strong religion' by way of classical church/sect theory; theories of fundamentalism; social movement theories; rational choice theory; and secularization theories.

TRS 786: God and Goddess in Hinduism

3.00 Credits

This course explores the many ways in which Hindus visualize and talk about the divine, and its manifestations in the world, using mythic stories, the images used in worship, explanations of the nature of the soul and the body in relation to the divine, and the belief in living, human embodiments of God in Hindu holy men and women. Topics addressed include: the religious meanings of masculine and feminine in the divine; the idea of local, family, and "chosen" divinities; and forms of Hindu devotion for women and men. Finally, ways of reasoning about God(s) and Goddesses in "Hindu Theology" are explored.

TRS 791: Mahayana Buddhism

3.00 Credits

This course will introduce the genesis, history, and major schools of the Mahayana branch of Buddhism, beginning with its origins in northern India during the first century B.C., to its elaborations into philosophical schools, Zen, Pure Land, esoteric/tantra, and others.

TRS 791A: Chinese and Japanese Buddhism

3.00 Credits

This course examines the Buddhist traditions of China and Japan. Beginning with a brief introduction to Indian Buddhism, the course then traces the migration of Buddhism into East Asia. It examines issues of linguistic and cultural translation, formation of indigenous schools, relations with the Chinese and Japanese governments, and developments in doctrine and praxis.

TRS 792: Directed Readings

2.00 Credits

With the permission and consultation of a particular faculty member, the student draws up a list of reading materials to read throughout the semester. The faculty member will agree with the student on the manner in which the student's appropriation of the reading list should be assessed and graded.

TRS 793B: Core Theological Texts and Motifs of World Religions

3.00 Credits

An intensive course, in English translation, of key primary texts and philosophical - theological - religious ideas of (A) Judaism, Islam, and Eastern / Arabic Christianity, or (B) Hinduism, Jainism, Sikhism, and Indo-Persian / Asian Islam, or (C) Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, and Shintoism. Particularly well suited to students of doctoral degree programs. Advanced master's students with permission of instructor only. Prerequisites: A World Religions course or/and an introductory course in one of the religions under study.

TRS 794: Ancient Near Eastern Religions

3.00 Credits

This course serves as a survey of the religious world of Mesopotamia, Egypt, and the Levant (excluding ancient Israel). Emphasis will be on creation myths, divine beings, ritual, personal religion, death and the afterlife. Sources for this exploration will include primary texts read in English translation, iconography, and archaeological evidence for religious beliefs and practices.

TRS 799: Proseminar for New Doctoral Students

0.00 Credits

This course is designed to provide detailed professional preparation for students at the doctoral level. Students will hear weekly presentations on such topics as the structure of a doctoral program, basic research methods, university risk and compliance issues, FERPA, dissertation defense procedures, academic dishonesty, and other topics important to the doctoral program.

TRS 801: Genesis I - XI

3.00 Credits

Primeval history as prologue to redemptive history, transformation of ancient traditions in the light of Israel's exodus faith, problems of history and myth, cosmic aspects of sin and redemption. Prerequisites: Hebrew, Greek.

TRS 801A: The Book of Exodus

3.00 Credits

A analysis of the Moses traditions in the Old Testament as reflected in the Book of Exodus. Treatment of Historical Criticism, literary criticism, form criticism, and tradition-history will open onto questions of the compositional history of the Pentateuch, the nature of ancient authorship and redaction, and the contribution of reading individual pericopes as examples of inner-biblical exegesis to the understanding of such passages.

TRS 802A: Deuteronomistic History

3.00 Credits

Involves an intensive examination of, as well as an attempt to evaluate, the major theories concerning the composition history of the deuteronomistic history from Noth (1943) to the present. Prerequisites: Hebrew, Greek.

TRS 802B: The Chronistic History

3.00 Credits

Following an opening survey of contemporary questions in the study of the Chronistic History, concentrates on a detailed study of selected texts in the parallel material of Chronicles and the Deuteronomistic History with a view to discerning how and why the Chronist adapts the latter work as he does. Prerequisite: Hebrew.

TRS 802D: Israel & Judah in Iron Age

3.00 Credits

The seminar will cover archaeological theories about the emergence of Biblical Israel as well as the period of the Israelite and Judean Monarchies until their demise at the beginning of the Assyrian/Babylonian Exile. Working with results of recent archaeological research the course will explore the significance of the material culture of the Israelites for the interpretation of Old Testament texts. Prerequisites: Hebrew, Greek.

TRS 802E: Exodus Traditions in the Hebrew Bible

3.00 Credits

Israel's exodus from Egypt stands at the heart of Old Testament theology. The experience of having been freed from foreign oppression by God's act of grace was reflected, reconsidered and rephrased throughout the literary development of the Hebrew Bible. The seminar will trace this process of theological interpretation, taking its point of departure in the Book of Exodus, continuing into the Prophets and the Psalms, and end with a brief exploration of the significance of the topic for Judaism and Early Christianity. Prerequisites: Hebrew, Greek.

TRS 802F: 1 and 2 Samuel

3.00 Credits

A close study of the Books of Samuel with particular attention to the relationships among textual criticism, source analysis, redaction criticism, and narrative approaches. The course will include readings on King David and the archeology and historiography of the 10th century.

TRS 803: Book of Tobit

3.00 Credits

The book's original language, structure, Greek recensions, historical framework, literary forms. Exegesis of selected passages and discussion of theological themes. Prerequisites: Hebrew, Greek.

TRS 804A: The Book of Wisdom

3.00 Credits

Original language, authorship, place and date of composition. The thought-world and literary forms. Jewish versus Hellenistic values. Cosmosoteriology. Personal immortality. Exegesis of the midrash on the Exodus (chaps. 11-19). Prerequisites: Hebrew, Greek.

TRS 804B: Wisdom of Ben Sira

3.00 Credits

The book's original language, Hebrew fragments, Greek recensions, canonical history, literary forms. Exegesis of selected passages on theological themes. Prerequisites: Hebrew, Greek, Syriac, Latin.

TRS 804C: The Psalms

3.00 Credits

This seminar emphasizes the form-critical study of the Psalms, the determination and elements of specific genres, and the search for Sitz im Leben especially within the ritual life of Israel. Significant attention is also given to poetic features of the Psalms and the redactional and canonical shaping of the Psalter as a whole.

TRS 804D: Prophets of the Late Pre-Exilic Period

3.00 Credits

The seminar will concentrate on the historical-critical exegesis of selected texts from the Book of Amos. These texts will be considered in their canonical context, with a special focus on the theology of the prophet and the editor(s) of the book.

TRS 804E: The Book of Amos

3.00 Credits

This course begins with an overview of Amos' person and times, the book attributed to him, and its place within the Book of the 12 Prophets. It will then focus on a close reading of selected texts of the Book of Amos.

TRS 804F: The Book of Jeremiah

3.00 Credits

A close study of selected passages from Jeremiah with special attention to the differences between the Masoretic and Old Greek texts. Critical evaluation of various approaches to prophetic literature, Hebrew poetry, and the reconstruction of Jeremiah's life, circumstances, and message.

TRS 804G: The Book of Ezekiel

3.00 Credits

The course will begin with an orientation to the questions surrounding the person, times book, text and message of Ezekiel. It will then continue with a presentation and discussion of student papers concerning the various kinds of texts found in the Book of Ezekiel.

TRS 805A: Theology and Exegesis I Isaiah

3.00 Credits

Historical background of the period; treatment of major themes of the teaching of Isaiah; special attention to disputed questions of his relationship to Davidic, Zion, and holy-war traditions and to the wisdom movement; detailed exegesis of selected passages. Prerequisites: Hebrew, Greek.

TRS 806: Book of Daniel

3.00 Credits

The book's composition, unity, literary forms, historical framework. The languages in MT, the deuterocanonical sections. Detailed exegesis. Theological questions: Son of Man, angelology, eschatology, problem of evil. Prerequisites: Hebrew, Aramaic, Greek.

TRS 806A: The Megilloth

3.00 Credits

Study of selected texts from the Megilloth, or Festival Scrolls (Ruth, Song of Songs, Ecclesiastes, Lamentations, Esther) with evaluation of various approaches to biblical interpretation applied to the Scrolls. These books individually and as a collection within the Jewish canon present a number of particular issues of canonicity and interpretation. The course will integrate close reading of selected passages from the Megilloth and directed readings in scholarly discussion of biblical interpretive approaches.

TRS 806B: The Book of Job

3.00 Credits

A study of the book of Job including its place in Scripture and in the international tradition of ancient wisdom literature. Close analysis of selected passages and discussion of textual and philological methods.

TRS 807: The Book of Kings

3.00 Credits

Critical study of the books of Kings, with attention directed to particular sections that not only deal with important periods in the history of ancient Israel, but exemplify the character and techniques of biblical historiography. Focus on the Masoretic Hebrew text with ancient versions and archaeological and textual sources from elsewhere in the ancient Near East.

TRS 808A: Textual Criticism of the Old Testament

3.00 Credits

The course introduces students to the practice of textual criticism of the Old Testament and how growing knowledge of scribal practice informs this work. It includes the application of comparative philology to textual problems. Prerequisites: SEM 711 or equivalent and GR101 or GR501.

TRS 808B: Old Testament Theology

3.00 Credits

Treats the problem and method of Old Testament theology. Suggests effective principles and methods to understand the full meaning of the biblical text in order to tackle and resolve issues at the leading edge of hermeneutics and biblical theology. Detailed study of heuristics, selected ideas (covenant, kingship, eschatology, etc.), canonical criticism, salvation history, dialectic and symbolic hermeneutics, communal reading/narratological approaches. Prerequisite: A background in the graduate study of the Old Testament. Also, Biblical Hebrew and at least one of the following: French or German.

TRS 809B: New Testament Theology

3.00 Credits

An investigation of the origin, nature, and method of New Testament theology. A critical discussion of the major works on New Testament theology. An exegetical study of selected topics: God, Christ, Church, the moral life. Prerequisite: Biblical Greek.

TRS 810B: The Parables of Jesus

3.00 Credits

Historical Jesus research has focused strongly upon the parables of Jesus, as they are recorded in the Synoptic Gospels, and in some parallel non-canonical literature, as perhaps the best evidence of Jesus' original teaching. However, they have been modified and used within the literary and theological agendas of the Synoptic Gospels. Within the parables the reader of the Gospels is also in close touch with the social setting of the birth of Christianity. The course will select from the parables of Jesus and analyze them under these major concerns of contemporary New Testament studies. Prerequisites Biblical Greek.

TRS 810C: Source and Redaction Criticism in the Synoptic Gospels

3.00 Credits

This seminar surveys the history of source critical theories proposed for solving the Synoptic Problem and the consequences of these theories for redaction criticism. Students will engage source theories that remain current today by considering how these theories explain the literary relationship of the Synoptic Gospel. They will then test two theories in addition to the currently dominant Two-Source Theory, by writing redaction-critical papers on specific Synoptic passages.

TRS 810D: Passion Narratives

3.00 Credits

This course is a doctoral seminar that studies the Passion Narratives of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John in terms of their historical setting, their theological meaning, and their literary relationships to each other. After a series of working sessions on the Markan Passion Narrative, each member of the seminar will present an exegetical study of a particular passage from one of the Passion Narratives.

TRS 811A: The Gospel According to Matthew

3.00 Credits

After a number of introductory sessions treating the synoptic problem and specific issues pertinent to Matthean scholarship, the overall structure and message of the Gospel will be discussed. The major focus of the seminar is the relationship of Matthew and his community to Judaism and the Gospel's use of Israel's scriptures. Prerequisite: Biblical Greek.

TRS 811B: The Gospel According to Mark

3.00 Credits

After a consideration of recent research on the Gospel of Mark, the participants of this seminar course will conduct an exegetical analysis of the Greek text, including the shorter and longer ending of the Gospel. Each student will be expected to lead the discussion of a seminar session, as well as write and present an exegetical paper. Each paper will then be revised in light of the critiques offered by the participants of the seminar. Prerequiste: Biblical Greek

TRS 811C: The Gospel According to Luke

3.00 Credits

An introduction to the contemporary study of the Gospel of Luke: the use of the Gospel of Mark, the Q Source, the possibility of a "proto-Luke," and the literary and theological unity of the Gospel of Luke and the Acts of the Apostles. The overall structure and message of Luke-Acts. Detailed analysis of select passages from the Gospel of Luke, devoting special attention to the unique contribution of this Gospel to the early Church's Christology and Soteriology. Prerequisite: Biblical Greek.

TRS 812A: The Gospel According to John

3.00 Credits

Surveys major issues in both the classical and contemporary study of the Fourth Gospel, especially its literary unity and the theological point of view of its author(s). A discrete literary section of the Gospel will be subjected to detailed exegetical analysis, devoting detailed attention to the contribution of this Gospel to emerging Christian thought. Prerequisite: Biblical Greek.

TRS 812E: The Joannine Epistles

3.00 Credits

Considers the emergence of the Catholic Epistles (James, 1-2 Peter, Jude, 1-3 John) within the Christian Canon; and the origin, order, and authorship of 1-3 John. Key pericopes of 1 John and the whole of 2 and 3 John are exegeted in detail. Particular attention to the place of the Johannine Epistles within the Johannine tradition, and their relationship to the Fourth Gospel. Prerequisite: Biblical Greek.

TRS 813: Acts of the Apostles

3.00 Credits

A survey of exegetical and theological approaches to the interpretation of Acts; exegesis of selected passages. Prerequisite: Biblical Greek.

TRS 814A: Pauline Theology

3.00 Credits

After considering the nature of Pauline Theology, this seminar examines Paul's Christology, soteriology, ecclesiology, ethics, and eschatology. Students will read works on Pauline Theology and write an exegetical paper on an aspect of Pauline Theology. Prerequisite: Biblical Greek.

TRS 814B: The Thessalonian Correspondence

3.00 Credits

After a study of the Hellenistic letter, a detailed exegesis of portions of 1 Thessalonians as the oldest of Paul's letters and 2 Thessalonians as an example of early Christian pseudepigraphy will be made. Prerequisite: Biblical Greek.

TRS 814C: First Corinthians

3.00 Credits

After an introduction to problems related to the unity of the letter and the situation at Corinth, exegesis of individual passages will aid in discerning the nature of the struggles within the community and the apostle's response them. Prerequisite: Biblical Greek.

TRS 814D: The Corinthian Correspondence

3.00 Credits

This seminar considers the theological significance of Paul's Corinthian correspondence (1 & 2 Corinthians) in light of the historical situation that occasioned these letters. The seminar gives special attention to Paul's understanding of his apostleship, Christ's death, the resurrection of the dead, the church, and the moral life of believers.

TRS 814E: Second Corinthians

3.00 Credits

An investigation of the letter's historical background in light of Paul's dealings with the church at Corinth; a consideration of the letter's literary integrity; an exegetical study of major texts. Prerequisite: Biblical Greek.

TRS 814F: Epistle to the Romans

3.00 Credits

After an introduction to the circumstances of composition and the literary structure of the epistle, key pericopes are exegeted with a view to grasping Paul's mature theology. Prerequisite: Biblical Greek.

TRS 814G: Galatians and Philipppians

3.00 Credits

An exegetical study that focuses upon the Pauline concepts of law, justification, and righteousness. Prerequisite: Biblical Greek.

TRS 814H: Colossians and Ephesians

3.00 Credits

A detailed exegetical study of the Greek text of Colossians and Ephesians, concentrating on their relation to the rest of the Pauline corpus and their specific theological teaching. Prerequisite: Biblical Greek.

TRS 814J: The Catholic Epistles

3.00 Credits

Considers the emergence of the Catholic Epistles (James, 1-2 Peter, Jude, 1-3 John) within the Christian canon. The background, setting, and overall argument of James and 1 Peter are studied in detail. Exegesis of major passages selected from these two letters. Prerequisite: Biblical Greek. (Previously BBSD 882)

TRS 814K: Pastoral Epistles

3.00 Credits

An introduction into the problems of authenticity, place, and time of composition; the texts of the three Pastoral Epistles are exegeted in order. Prerequisite: Biblical Greek.

TRS 814L: The Letter to the Ephesians

3.00 Credits

A detailed exegetical study of the Greek text of Ephesians, concentrating on it relation to the rest of the Pauline corpus and its specific theological teaching.

TRS 814M: Epistle to the Hebrews

3.00 Credits

After a consideration of recent research on the Letter to the Hebrews, particularly with regard to its literary structure, the participants of this seminar course will conduct an exegetical analysis of the Greek text. Each student will be expected to lead the discussion of a seminar session, as well as write and present an exegetical paper. Each paper will then be revised in light of the critiques offered by the participants of the seminar. Prerequisite: Biblical Greek.

TRS 814N: Philemon, Colossians and Philippians

3.00 Credits

After a consideration of recent research on Paul's Letters to Philemon, to the Colossians, and to the Philippians, particularly with regard to their literary structures, the Seminar will conduct an exegetical analysis these three letters. Students will write and present exegetical papers, which they will revise in light of the critiques offered by the participants of the Seminar.

TRS 816A: The Book of Revelation

3.00 Credits

After a consideration of recent research on the Book of Revelation, particularly with regard to its literary structure, the seminar participants will conduct an exegetical analysis of the Greek text. Each student will be expected to lead the discussion of a seminar session, as well as write and present an exegetical paper. Each paper will then be revised in light of the critiques offered by the participants of the seminar.

TRS 820: Augustine in the Middle Ages: Augustine and 12th Cent. Spirituality

3.00 Credits

If it is a truism that twelfth-century theology was Augustinian, nevertheless we still have insufficiently precise knowledge of how individual theologians made use of Augustine. This is especially true of twelfth-century mystical writers, whose reliance on Augustinian epistemology has gone largely unnoticed. In this class, after first reading key Augustinian epistemological texts -- we shall read these in Latin, so that we will recognize at once the use of Augustinian language by twelfth-century writers -- we shall focus on works of two justly-famous twelfth-century mystical theologians, William of St. Thierry and Richard of St. Victor, to examine their incorporation of Augustinian epistemology. A principal goal of the course is to see how mystical theology in the twelfth century was not a separate enterprise but was rather the culmination of an integrated theology, built on the Bible, founded on reason, and aimed at union with God.

TRS 821D: Latin Patristic Commentaries on Creed(s)

3.00 Credits

This seminar studies various Latin early Christian creeds (The Apostles' Creed and its local variations, the Nicene Creed, and the Athanasian Creed) and the commentaries on these by several authors, such as Augustine of Hippo, Rufinus of Aquileia, Peter Chrysologus, Niceta of Remesiana, and Quodvultdeus.

TRS 821E: Latin Patristic Commentaries on Paul

3.00 Credits

This course focuses on the 4th century Latin commentaries of the Pauline epistles, preeminently on Ambrosiaster, and studies these in their historical and theological contexts. Special attention will be on Paul's Letter to Galatians. Students are encouraged to take this course after TRS 721: Principles of Patristic Exegesis, which studies the hermeneutics of Latin fathers.

TRS 822D: Irenaeus and the Gnostics

3.00 Credits

An examination of the culture, historical context, and thought world of the second century theologian, Irenaeus of Lyon, including the confrontation with Valentianian Gnosticism, the interpretation of Scripture, eschatology, the Adam-Christ typology, the divine economy, baptism, salvation, and the spirit. The questions and directions he established for the future will also be considered.

TRS 822E: Maximus the Confessor and His World

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 823E: Medieval Christology

3.00 Credits

Examines Thomas Aquinas's and Bonaventure's Commentary on the third book of Peter Lombard's Sentences as well as other significant texts that contextualize their thought.

TRS 823F: Topics in Medieval Church History

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 823G: 12th Centruy Evangelical Awakening

3.00 Credits

This course will survey the evangelical awakening that swept over twelfth century Europe, revivifying old institutions and making way for new ones. Reading many different genres of sources (such as letters, sermons and annals), we shall focus our attention particularly on those evangelical reforms (e.g. of the monastic orders; of the canons regular; of the secular clergy; of the papacy itself; and of the episcopate) that remade Christian life in the twelfth century.

TRS 824: Glossa ordinaria

3.00 Credits

This course will be an in-depth study of the biblical Glossa ordinaria. We shall focus on some book, some thinker, or some theme that illumines the great twelfth-century historical/theological project that produced multiple editions of the Gloss.

TRS 825B: The Catholic Reformation

3.00 Credits

Topics: The Papacy and the Renaissance; The Papacy and the Reformation; Issues in Controversialist Theology.

TRS 825G: Power in the Church, Gallican Model

3.00 Credits

Until the end of the nineteenth century, Gallican ecclesiology, although it offered a different "model" of the Church, was a tolerated alterative to the Roman perspective. How could these two different conceptions of authority, of "power in the Church," coexist for such a long time and why was the Gallican one finally condemned? Addresses these questions with a study based on major documents and the practices of that period.

TRS 825H: Aspects of Jansenism

3.00 Credits

Jansenism is a generic term used to describe a certain type of religious principles and social behavior in Europe during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The usual chronological presentation suggests a coherent movement, evolving from mysticism to revolt and from resistance to organized revolution. The purpose of the seminar is to approach the question from a different angle, by reconstructing the different aspects of Jansenism as they can be observed in the religious history of the period.

TRS 825L: Americanism and Modernism

3.00 Credits

These late nineteenth-century developments were unified by the drive to construct a synthesis of religion and culture according to the dominant intellectual, social, and religious trends of the times. The historical topography of these isms will be explored with particular attention to the major and minor participants in the movements of reform and reaction, ca. 1870-1910.

TRS 825O: Selected Topics in Bonaventure

3.00 Credits

An investigation of Bonaventure's De triplici via, a compendium of medieval mystical theology centered on his theology of the spiritual life as a threefold process of maturation rooted in the practice of lectio divina and concomitant with medieval exegesis. Placing the text in the context of Bonaventure's Itinerarium mentis in Deum IV and the Prologue to his Commentary on the Gospel of Luke, the seminar will proceed to examine in detail his De triplici via. Knowledge of Medieval Latin will be helpful.

TRS 826: Sources of American Spirituality

3.00 Credits

Aimed at discerning the distinctively American manifestations of spirituality and devotionalism. Examines a wide variety of sources ranging from correspondence of prominent persons to fiction and material culture. With a focus on the Catholic experience of ultimate meanings, students' research papers will reflect the significance of contexts shaped by ethnicity, race, class, and gender.

TRS 826A: Patristic Seminar: Hilary of Poitiers De Trinitate

3.00 Credits

A study of the fourth century Trinitarian theology and controversies in light of a significant treatise of a pro-Nicene Latin theologian Hilary of Poitiers. Latin and a major research paper required.

TRS 827: Inaugural Sermons of Medieval Masters

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 827C: Bonaventure, Parisian Master: Context, Texts, Interpretation

3.00 Credits

Examines the context and thought of Saint Bonaventure during his Parisian period as a student and master of theology, c. 1248 - 1257. The course will also introduce the student to the many literary forms of scholastic theology, the key figures at the University of Paris who shaped Bonaventure's mind, including Alexander of Hales, and the hermeneutical challenges of interpreting Bonaventure due to the growth of medieval studies and the nineteenth century edition of his texts.

TRS 828C: Seminar: Council of Trent

3.00 Credits

An in-depth study through readings, papers, and discussion of select topics dealing with the background, debates, contents, interpretation, and implementation of conciliar decrees on scripture and tradition, justification, sacraments, sacrifice of the Mass, preaching, episcopal duties, the lower clergy, seminaries, religious orders, sacred art and music, the Roman Catechism, Index of Forbidden Books, Congregation of the Council, etc.

TRS 830D: An Abridged History of Christian Political Thought

3.00 Credits

Through a reading of primary texts, introduces students to many of the classic texts of Christian political analysis. Beginning with Jeremiah and moving through Saints Augustine and Thomas, concludes with the most recent papal encyclicals. Topical concerns include capital punishment, development of religious liberty and separation of church and state, conscientious objection, and other issues.

TRS 830E: Ethics and Politics in St. Augustine (MT/E Core #1)

3.00 Credits

Explores selected texts of Augustine dealing with classic questions influencing Christian moral thought, including for instance, divine and human authority, free will and grace, war and peace.

TRS 831: Ethics and Social Theory

3.00 Credits

This course provides a primer in classical and contemporary social theory with an eye to its significance for ethics. How do accounts of ethics conceive of the character and workings of human society? How do conceptions of social dynamics reflect the ethical concerns of their authors? Several traditions of social thought (e.g. critical theory, pragmatism) will be addressed, along with central concepts (e.g. agency, practices) and issues (e.g. postmodernism, globalization) arising at the intersection of ethics and social theory.

TRS 832: Thomistic Moral Theologies

3.00 Credits

An analysis of contemporary interpretations of the ethics of St. Thomas Aquinas. Goals of the course include a) to further understanding of the context, contours, and content of Aquinas' account of moral theology, and b) to gain insight into contemporary debates in moral theology, with regard to both methodological and issue-oriented question.

TRS 833A: Advanced Topics in: Sexual and Familial Ethics

3.00 Credits

An in-depth study of a selected topic or topics in sexual and familial ethics. Please consult the individual instructor for more details.

TRS 833B: Advanced Topics in Biomedical Ethics

3.00 Credits

An in-depth study of a selected topic or topics in biomedical ethics. Please consult the individual instructor for more details.

TRS 833C: Advanced Topics in Social Ethics

3.00 Credits

An in-depth study of a selected topic or topics in social ethics. Please consult the individual instructor for more details. Spring 2014: This course explores the social question of religious freedom as a contemporary ethical challenge in a global political context. The course is organized around Vatican II's Declaration on Religious Freedom and the modern social encyclical tradition that both inspired and continues to develop Church teaching on the question. Readings will include relevant theological, philosophical, sociological, and historical literature addressing the topics of conscience, religious toleration, Church-state relations, secularism, human rights, democracy, and persecution.

TRS 833D: The Theology of Gift

3.00 Credits

The aim of this course is to offer to the students a new approach to moral theology/Christian ethics. In the past Catholic theology often engaged philosophical traditions so as to articulate the beliefs which Christians accepted from their faith tradition. For example, St. Thomas Aquinas invoked Aristotle, Karl Rahner drew on the transcendental method. This approach will seek to dialogue with the contemporary philosophers of "Gift." This does not mean abandoning the Thomist tradition, as will become clear in the development of the argument. Particular attention will be given to the philosophy of Jean-Luc Marion, a French philosopher who has made a notable contribution to contemporary philosophy.

TRS 834: The Philosophy and Theology of Slavery

3.00 Credits

Many commentators note the ambiguous status of the slave. That ambiguous status is captured in Roman law, which simultaneously identified the slave as a human being (persona) and a thing (res). The social status of the slave becomes complicated by the adoption of the term in early Christianity, from the Gospels forward, where Christians willingly refer to themselves as slaves. The history of the Christian west reflects the ambiguity of the slave's status and the embrace of slavery rhetoric in the Christian scriptures. In this course we will study some of the philosophical and theological approaches to the institution of slavery looking to identify two things: an adequate notion of slavery, and the theological resources to construct a "theology of slavery" that adequately addresses this relationship of man to man.

TRS 834A: Morality and Emotion

3.00 Credits

An examination of the role of the emotions in the moral life. Particular topics include the nature of emotion (or "passion"), the similarities and differences between human and animal emotional responses, the relationship between the emotions and distinctively human powers of rationality, the impact of emotions on moral decision-making, and the human capacity to shape not just actions arising out of emotion but emotional responses themselves. Sources for the course include Christian and non-Christian texts in the Western tradition, beginning with Greek and Roman thinkers, continuing through giants in the Christian tradition such as Augustine and Aquinas, and concluding with contemporary philosophical, theological and some neurobiological research.

TRS 835B: The Moral Theology of St. Thomas (MT/E Core #2)

3.00 Credits

An examination of original texts, with special attention to questions of fundamental moral theology.

TRS 835C: Seminar on MacIntyre

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 836: Catholicism & The Marketplace

3.00 Credits

The course has as its purpose the introduction of students to significant themes in theological analysis of economic thought. The course briefly engages the history of economic thought, focusing some attention on scholastic economic reflection. The bulk of the course, however, will be applying that reflection to contemporary debates about the strengths and weaknesses of neoliberal economic and social policies.

TRS 840: Liturgical Theology

3.00 Credits

A review and critique of representative contemporary attempts to recover the classic dictum lex orandi, lex credendi in light of its earliest formulation and use in mystagogy and theology. Special attention will be given to questions of methodology.

TRS 841B: Contemporary Sacramental Method

3.00 Credits

Presentation, assessment, and critique of significant contemporary approaches to sacramental theology, including Louis-Marie Chauvet, Herbert Vorgrimler, Karl Rahner, Edward Schillebeeckx, and others.

TRS 841C: Sacramental Treatises

3.00 Credits

A study of selections from classical treatises on the sacraments from authors such as Tertullian, Augustine, Cyril of Jerusalem and Thomas Aquinas. Requirements include background reading for each text, the texts themselves, discussion of the texts in class and a final term paper.

TRS 842A: Interpreting the Ritual Event

3.00 Credits

In this seminar the work of selected ritual theorists will be used to explore various approaches to interpreting ritual events. The approaches can be useful in the study of liturgy or other religious rituals. Students will be expected to produce a research paper of 25-35 pages and to present their papers in the seminar.

TRS 842B: The Body in Ritual Studies

3.00 Credits

This seminar will explore the topic of "the body" in ritual from a variety of perspectives (e.g. biological, social, cultural, religious). Students will be expected to produce a research paper of 25-35 pages and to present their papers in the seminar.

TRS 843: Liturgical Life in Jerusalem

3.00 Credits

An analysis of the 4th to 10th Century liturgical practices in Jerusalem as seen through the following documents: Egeria, Catechesis of St. Cyril of Jerusalem, the Armenian Lectionary, the homelies of Hesychius of Jerusalem, the Georgian Lectionary, and the Anastasis Typikon. The course will deal with principles of interpretation as well as demonstrating the changes and development through the centuries.

TRS 843A: Constantinople: The City and Its Liturgy

3.00 Credits

An analysis of the history of the Byzantine Rite up to present times in its context, the city of Constantinople and its cathedral, Hagia Sophia. Documents examined include the so-called Typikon of the Great Church, The Typikon of Evergetis Monastery, The Book of Ceremonies, and a selection of Byzantine liturgical commentaries. Attention will be placed on the interaction between ritual celebration, liturgical setting (architecture, iconography, city plan) and mystagogy. Sources will be read in the original Greek.

TRS 844: Penance in the First Millennium

3.00 Credits

The reconciliation of penitents will be examined as it appears in various types of source literature, both Greek and Latin, through the first millennium. This study focuses on the ritual acts of reconciliation leading to an elaboration of their theological meaning.

TRS 845: Sources of the Ordo Missae

3.00 Credits

A seminar studying the origins of the current ordo missae of the Roman Rite from scriptural and patristic origins to the medieval processes that led to the formation of the 1570 Missale Romanum.

TRS 845DM: Foundations in Liturgical and Catechetical Documents

3.00 Credits

This blended online course studies major liturgical and catechetical documents promulgated before and after the Second Vatican Council. The purpose of the course is to gain a general knowledge of the content of the documents and to participate in class discussion in order to make appropriate application of the content to pastoral ministry.

TRS 846: Liturgies of Death and Dying

3.00 Credits

A seminar exploring the texts and rubrics of various medieval and modern liturgies of death and dying in the Christian East and West.

TRS 847: Liturgical Celebration of the Word of God

3.00 Credits

Origins of celebrating the word in scriptural and patristic witness, medieval development of the lectionary system in East and West, Tridentine codification of the lectionary, and recent reform of the liturgy of the word. Primary focus on the Word within the Eucharist. Foundations of a liturgical theology of the Word of God proclaimed.

TRS 848: Mystagogy

3.00 Credits

This course will chart the various meanings, methodologies and praxis of mystagogia within the history of the Christian tradition beginning with the early Church witnesses. Contemporary scholars and liturgical/catechetical practices will also be studied so as to explore the possibilities for a twenty-first century understanding of mystagogy in faith formation and liturgical theology.

TRS 850: Doctor of Ministry Pastoral Supervision

3.00 Credits

Doctor of Ministry Pastoral Supervision: A supervised ministry experience. Students negotiate pastoral placements. Individual and group supervision of verbatims and case studies. Emphasis on student's initiative and creative efforts to integrate pastoral theological learning, theological reflection, and pastoral care. Enrollment restricted to Doctor of Ministry students

TRS 850A: Doctor of Ministry Pastoral Supervision I

3.00 Credits

A two-semester supervised ministry experience. Students negotiate pastoral placements. Individual and group supervision of verbatims and case studies. Emphasis on student's initiative and creative efforts to integrate pastoral theological learning, theological reflection, and pastoral care. Enrollment restricted to Doctor of Ministry students.

TRS 850B: Doctor of Ministry Pastoral Supervision II

3.00 Credits

A two-semester supervised ministry experience. Students negotiate pastoral placements. Individual and group supervision of verbatims and case studies. Emphasis on student's initiative and creative efforts to integrate pastoral theological learning, theological reflection, and pastoral care. Enrollment restricted to Doctor of Ministry students.

TRS 851A: Pastoral Counseling

3.00 Credits

Didactic material and critiqued videotape role-plays designed to refine student's style and method of pastoral counseling. Counseling theory and dynamics, the pastoral and theological dimensions of counseling, specific problem areas such as addiction, depression, faith struggles, transition, loss, etc.

TRS 851C: The Art of Pastoral Listening

3.00 Credits

An exploration of the art of pastoral listening, looking at ourselves as listeners as well as developing skills for listening in one-on-one settings, group settings, and in difficult conversations. It will explore listening in pastoral settings and in theological reflection. Participants can expect to engage in a variety of activities to learn how they listen and what difference it can make in their ministry.

TRS 851DM: Caring Conversations for Effective Pastoral Ministry

3.00 Credits

Course designed to refine and further develop the pastoral minister's style and method of pastoral care and counseling conversations. Lecture and class discussion of assigned readings will be combined with critiqued video taped role plays in order to deepen communication skills, interpersonal dynamics and theological reflection in the practice of ministry.

TRS 852: Pastoral Theology for Doctor of Ministry Students

3.00 Credits

Examines the nature, function, and development of the discipline of Pastoral Theology. Engages students in the process of theological reflection and cultural analysis.

TRS 852A: Theology of Lay Ministry

3.00 Credits

An exploration of the development of the role of laity serving in the contemporary Church as lay ecclesial ministers. The course will focus on the ecclesial documents, professional standards, lived reality, skills and gifts needed for effective ministry.

TRS 853: Men and Ministry

3.00 Credits

Seminar analyzes current perspectives on masculinity, ministry, and male spirituality. Examines the influences of family of origin, gender, intimacy, power, and spirituality on the exercise of pastoral care.

TRS 853A: Evangelization and the Mission of the Parish

3.00 Credits

This course seeks to examine the Church's mission of evangelization in light of the mission of the parish and to examine successful programs and potential models for both the ministry of evangelization and the formation of evangelizers.

TRS 853DM: Reproposing the Good News: The New Evangelization

3.00 Credits

With Christ's words: Go and Make disciples of all Nations, his followers have a mandate to proclaim the Good News in word and in deed. This course will seek to understand evangelization in the Catholic Church. Through reviewing the history and literature of evangelization especially its current renaissance as the 'new evangelization" from Popes Paul VI through Benedict XVI, participants will study papal documents, pastoral letters pertinent to the USA, current diocesan projects and programs with the ultimate goal of formalizing a project of the new evangelization for one's mission or ministry.

TRS 854A: Use of Small Groups in Parish Ministry

3.00 Credits

Focuses on the theory and experience of utilizing small groups in pastoral work. Didactic and experiential, using the case study method to understand group process, structure and function, as well as styles of leadership and authority, decision making, conflict resolution, and change.

TRS 854B: Family Systems Theory and Pastoral Ministry

3.00 Credits

Correlates family systems theory with the practice of ministry. Students gain an understanding of and an ability to use genograms, family of origin themes, and leadership models in parish ministry.

TRS 854C: Canon Law for the Pastoral Minister

3.00 Credits

Examines the nature, history, and function of Church law or canon law. Surveys the norms of the 1983 Code of Canon Law in the areas of general norms, the rights and obligations of the Christian faithful, sacraments, Church structures, the teaching office of the Church, temporal goods, and sanctions. Particular attention to the norms reflecting current pastoral issues.

TRS 854DM: Theology of Pastoral Leadership

3.00 Credits

Pastoral leadership is directed at building up communities of faith and forming disciples. The focus of this course is both theological, looking at the theological and vocational foundations of leadership and practical, looking at best practices in leadership, management and collaboration. The course requirements include reading, theological reflection, discussion boards, class presentations and concrete application to participant's current ministerial situation.

TRS 855: Ministry of Spiritual Direction

3.00 Credits

Examines the history, principles, and practice of spiritual direction. This ministry is compared and contrasted with helping processes such as counseling and psychotherapy. The director's role and the dynamics and discernment are investigated as well as theological and psychological perspectives on the process. Scriptural and theological foundations for direction are considered. Pastoral guidelines for doing spiritual direction are presented.

TRS 855B: Ministry of Spiritual Direction II

3.00 Credits

Examines the history, principles, and practice of spiritual direction. This ministry is compared and contrasted with helping processes such as counseling and psychotherapy. The director's role and the dynamics and discernment are investigated as well as theological and psychological perspectives on the process. Scriptural and theological foundations for direction are considered. Pastoral guidelines for doing spiritual direction are presented.

TRS 855C: Principles and Practices of Adult Religious Education

2.00 Credits

Although open to other doctoral and masters level students, this course is specifically designed for students in the Doctor of Ministry program. Explores the basic principles of adult education and adult faith formation, theories of understanding and techniques of effective education, including on-line learning. The course will also provide practical application and the tools needed to create and implement units and courses in Adult Religious Education.

TRS 855D: Pastoral Planning: Spirituality and Praxis

2.00 Credits

This course will present participants with a long-term, systematic process of assessing needs, establishing goals and implementing a plan of action in ecclesial organizations. Participants will study the dynamics and application of a model for strategic planning and decision making. An essential component of the course will be spiritual reflection on how pastoral planning furthers the mission of the Church and is integral for leadership and development of staff personnel in organizations.

TRS 855E: Doctor of Ministry Seminar

3.00 Credits

The Doctor of Ministry Seminar will focus on identifying and describing a significant issue in pastoral ministry, and then designing a practical project to address the issue, identifying the project's purpose, underlying research, design and implementation, evaluation and the contribution it will make to ministry. The goal of the course is to develop a Project in Ministry Proposal that is ready to present to the Doctor of Ministry Committee.

TRS 856B: Mthd for Study/Teaching Christian Spirituality

3.00 Credits

Christian Spirituality is an academic discipline that, of its nature, is interdisciplinary and, therefore, embraces biblical, historical-systematic, and liturgical disciplines. It is also be seen as an essential part of a pastoral discipline that is also interdisciplinary and embraces a broad contemporary understanding of approaches and dynamics. This course will examine methods for studying and teaching the pastoral dimensions of this discipline.

TRS 856C: Spiritual Practices

3.00 Credits

This seminar will investigate some traditional spiritual practices as a means of shaping and forming a religious and virtuous self. Contributions of Michel Foucault, Michel de Certeau, Talal Assad, and others on the important role of spiritual practices will provide a theoretical perspective.

TRS 856D: The Beginnings& Development of Monasticism in LateAntiquity&theChristian East:Evagrius,hisOpp.&Heirs

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 856DM: Spirituality in the Workplace

3.00 Credits

This course draws on the principles and practices of Ignatian spirituality as a resource for developing a spirituality for the work place. Topics to be studied include: The worldview of Ignatius of Loyola, the Spiritual Exercises, and the fundamental elements of Christian discipleship from an Ignatian point of view with a special focus on discernment and decision-making.

TRS 857: Sources of American Spirituality

3.00 Credits

Aimed at discerning the distinctively American manifestations of spirituality and devotionalism. Examines a wide variety of sources ranging from correspondence of prominent persons to fiction and material culture. With a focus on the Catholic experience of ultimate meanings, students' research papers will reflect the significance of contexts shaped by ethnicity, race, class, and gender.

TRS 858A: The Self: Theological and Psychological Perspectives

3.00 Credits

An investigation of the self as a focus of both psychological and spiritual development. Attention is given to both the spiritual traditions of the East and West on the self and of contemporary efforts to integrate insights of depth psychology and theology.

TRS 858B: Religion and Feelings

3.00 Credits

An exploration of the role of affectivity in religion along with considerations of recent contributions to the psychology of emotion and of studies on the way emotions shape personalities and cultures and guide behavior.

TRS 858C: Spiritual Practices

3.00 Credits

A study of some of the traditional spiritual practices as a means of shaping and forming a religious and virtuous self. Contributions of Michel Foucault, Michel de Certeau, Talal Assad, and others on the important role of practices will provide a theoretical perspective.

TRS 858D: Lectio Divina and Related Spiritual Practices

3.00 Credits

This seminar explores the evolving practice of lectio divina and various theological and psychological interpretations of that practice and then proceeds to examine other transformative spiritual practices closely intertwined with reading. Primary texts of major figures such as Origen, Augustine, Bernard, Hugh of St. Victor, and Guigo II will be examined as providing a foundation for lectio. Participants will also investigate the interrelationship of lectio with the practices of silence, meditation, prayer, contemplation, collation, and witness.

TRS 859: Method in Christian Spirituality

3.00 Credits

This seminar will examine the recent discussions about definitions of, approaches to, and the teaching of Christian spirituality. Participants will be expected to write and present a major seminar paper from one of the major perspectives on spirituality proposed by contemporary scholars and to participate actively in presentations by other students.

TRS 859A: The Spirituality of Aquinas and Eckhart

3.00 Credits

The Spirituality of Aquinas and Eckhart: A study of the spiritual teaching of Thomas Aquinas and Meister Eckhart, with special attention to their similarities and differences and their subsequent influence.

TRS 859B: Origen and Origenism

3.00 Credits

Origen of Alexandria established a comprehensive approach to early Christian thought and practice which left an often controversial mark on later Christian theology and spirituality. This doctoral seminar examines both the thought of Origen and the extension and development of his thought in thinkers like Eusebius of Caesarea, Gregory of Nyssa, Evagrius of Pontus and other teachers and mystics through the "isochristoi" of the sixth century.

TRS 860C: Theology, Culture and Language

3.00 Credits

Christian theology has always attended to the significance of language, and its ability to refer truly. This seminar takes the linguistic turn, in modern philosophical and theological thought (e.g., Mohler, Wittgenstein, Barth, Lindbeck), as a starting point for examining how an attentiveness to language has shaped modern Thomist thought. Students will read Thomas Aquinas and his English Dominican interpreters such as Conrad Peppler, Cornelius Ernst, Victor White, Herbert McCabe, and Fergus Kerr.

TRS 861: Augustine¿s City of God

3.00 Credits

Augustine's City of God is one of the most important Christian texts, not only in the history of the Church, but in western civilization itself. This seminar aims to provide students with a doctoral seminar discussion around close readings of the entirety of the City of God, utilizing the original text, translations, and reception history to assist our understanding of this classic in the Christian canon

TRS 862A: Contemporary Problems in Ecclesiology

3.00 Credits

Selected questions in current ecclesiology: methodology, local/universal Church, ecumenism, salvation, evangelization, collegiality, and teaching authority. Seminar format: lecture and discussion.

TRS 862B: Being a Missionary Church

3.00 Credits

The purpose of this course is to envision the Church of Christ as a body of believers which is missionary in its witness, in its word, in its action, and in its being. This mission is to proclaim the loving and saving presence of the Triune God in a changing and divided world. This requires the Church to attend to the realities of globalization, multiculturalism, ecumenical sharing, interreligous dialogue, and the promotion of justice, peace, and respect for the environment.

TRS 862C: Eucharist and Church

3.00 Credits

A doctoral seminar to explore and analyse aspects of the relationship between the Eucharist and the Church, with particular attention to eucharistic ecclesiology, i.e. a eucharistic approach to understanding the Church. The scriptural and patristic roots of such an ecclesiology are examined, as well as the major development of this approach to the Church in modern times and its considerable ecumenical importance. Various issues, such as the ability of eucharistic ecclesiology to incorporate an adequate reference to Baptism, the Word, and primacy in the Church, are examined.

TRS 862D: Method in Ecclesiology

3.00 Credits

An exploration of the distinct problems in conceiving and implementing a method for the study of the Church, with examples drawn from Augustine and Aquinas, but with the primary focus on recent discussions: e.g., the 20th-century revival of ecclesiology; the relationship between theological and sociological treatments of the Church, theory and practice in ecclesiology.

TRS 862DM: Context for Evangelization and Catechesis: The Domestic Church

3.00 Credits

The course explores ecclesial documents in developing an understanding of the family as the context for evangelization and catechesis and develops concrete pastoral methods for families to identify themselves as the Domestic Church

TRS 863A: Revelation and Faith: Vatican I to Vatican II

3.00 Credits

This doctoral seminar examines the theology of revelation and faith as presented by the First Vatican Council: Dei Filius (1870); postconciliar manualist presentations; preconciliar ressourcement; Second Vatican Council: Dei Verbum (1965); and postconciliar theologies. Students enrolled in the seminar are expected to prepare and present a research paper on some aspect of revelation and faith.

TRS 863B: Magisterium and Infallibility

3.00 Credits

This doctoral seminar considers the historical context and provides a systematic analysis of the teaching of Pastor Aeternus (Vatican I) and Lumen Gentium (Vatican II) as background for the contemporary discussion on magisterium, papal primacy, and infallibility. Students enrolled in the seminar are expected to prepare and present a research paper on some aspect of magisterium and infallibility.

TRS 863C: Hermeneutics of Tradition

3.00 Credits

The theme of Tradition is of central importance for Catholic theology, both systematic and moral. The notion of Tradition, however, has not been adequately investigated. The aim of this course is to study the development of the concept in Catholic theology and to propose a theory of tradition. Such a theory would contribute to the interpretation of the historical tradition and provide criteria for discerning genuine developments in doctrine and theology in both systematic and moral theology. The scope of the course will include Classic theology, especially that of St. Thomas Aquinas, Post-Tridentine theology, Newman, Blondel, Möhler, the changes brought by Vatican II and contemporary challenges to Tradition from post-modern thinkers.

TRS 863DM: Ministry in a Multicultural Church

3.00 Credits

this course will explore the culture contexts in which all pastoral ministry occurs in the 21st century North America. Particular attention will be given to the four broad categories useful for understanding various cultural experiences and interpretations of life today: primal, classical, modern and post-modern. It will also explore the emerging multi-cultural reality of Church and society with particular emphasis on cultures generically described as Hispanic, Asian, and African. Documents from the U.S.C.C.B. will be utilized as primary sources of study.

TRS 864B: The Character of God

3.00 Credits

Studies the differences between classical and contemporary treatments of the divine attributes and character. In dialogue with feminist theology and process thought, investigates questions concerning how God is appropriately named, and whether God changes or suffers, in an approach which affirms both the transcendence and immanence of God.

TRS 864C: Muslim God, Christian God

3.00 Credits

Do Christians and Muslims worship the same God? Why do they so often seem to talk past each other when it comes to the nature of God and how God is revealed in the world? The course seeks to explore the vital differences in the Muslim and Christian concepts of God, and how to address them in a mutually fruitful dialogue of faiths.

TRS 864D: Theology and Ecology

3.00 Credits

In these times of ecological crisis, what resources does the Christian tradition have to offer to current debate? This seminar considers a range of material from the last half-century, with particular attention to contributions from Christian East and West, and to the ecological discussion that has taken place under the auspices of the World Council of Churches.

TRS 864E: New Atheism and the Christian God

3.00 Credits

Dawkins, Harris, Dennett and others have recently accused religious beliefs of being unjustified and illusionary. Their attack questions the value of religion in general and the monotheistic concept of God. The course is meant to discuss the challenges coming from New Atheism and to explore the deeper sides of the Christian concept of God. Along the lines it will be necessary to deal with a Christian response to evolution, intelligent design, religious diversity, religiously motivated violence and the problem of superstition.

TRS 865: The Trinity in the Western Tradition

3.00 Credits

A survey and discussion of important Trinitarian texts in the Western branch of the Christian tradition, from such authors as Tertullian, Hilary, Augustine, and Aquinas, in the light of contemporary assessment of this heritage and concern for a renewed theology of the Trinity.

TRS 866B: Rome and Constantinople: From Schism to Dialogue

3.00 Credits

A survey of the relation between and the main theological differences between Eastern and Western Christianity. Interpretation of historical texts and texts of contemporary ecumenical dialogues.

TRS 866C: Catholic - Orthodox Dialogue

3.00 Credits

The international Catholic-Orthodox dialogue restarted in 2005. This course aims to study both historically and theologically the relationship between the Catholic and Orthodox Churches, with particular attention to the dialogue of charity initiated in the 1960s, the four agreed statements that were achieved between 1982 and 1993, and the issues facing the dialogue today. The complementarity of West and East is an important theme throughout and we reflect upon the challenge of being the same but different.

TRS 866D: History and Theology of the Ecumenical Movement

3.00 Credits

This doctoral seminar examines the origin and development of the World Council of Churches, The Faith and Order Commission: Baptism, Eucharist and Ministry, The Consultation on Church Union and Churches Uniting in Christ, and Vatican II, Decree on Ecumenism. Student papers focus on national and international bilateral conversations.

TRS 866E: Justification and Grace: Debates and Dialogues

3.00 Credits

An analysis of debates surrounding justification and grace in the 16th century, with particular attention given to Luther, Calvin, and the Council of Trent. The de auxiliis controversy will be discussed. Recent Protestant-Catholic ecumenical texts seeking to overcome differences on these issues will be considered.

TRS 866F: Eschatology: Historical and Theological Themes

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 867A: Chalcedon: Classical Dogma and Contemporary Interpretation

3.00 Credits

Emergence of the Christological formula of the Council of Chalcedon in its historical context. Contemporary hermeneutical issues and a conflict of interpretations among such authors as K. Rahner, P. Schoonenberg, R. Haight, B. Lonergan.

TRS 867C: Anselm and Aquinas on Redemption

3.00 Credits

Biblical and patristic background. Anselm, satisfaction, and the turn to theory. Aquinas, systematic context and integration with tradition.

TRS 867D: Aquinas on the Incarnation and Passion of Christ

3.00 Credits

The Life of Jesus in the Summa Theologica of Thomas Aquinas. An investigation of the Pars Tertia focused on what Christ did and suffered.

TRS 867E: Aquinas on Doctrine

3.00 Credits

This graduate seminar examines some of the major doctrines of the Christian faith as they have been expounded by St. Thomas Aquinas. Employing primary and secondary sources, such doctrines will include: revelation, creation, the Trinity, the Incarnation, soteriology, grace, sacraments and eschatology. Each student will be expected to present two short seminar papers and a final paper of twenty-five pages.

TRS 868A: Theology of God in Thomas Aquinas

3.00 Credits

Shows how, for St. Thomas, God is the object of the life of faith and the center and organizing principle of the task of theology. Readings draw from his major theological works, scriptural commentaries, and preaching. With consideration given to contemporary criticisms, argument will be made for the ongoing relevance of his theological achievement.

TRS 868B: Theology of St. Bonaventure

3.00 Credits

The course will offer an introduction to the systematic thought of St. Bonaventure. Reading knowledge of Latin Recommended.

TRS 868C: Spiritual Theology of John Henry Newman

3.00 Credits

This doctoral seminar traces Newman's spiritual journey as described in his Apologia Pro Vita Sua and examine his spiritual theology as presented in his sermons, conferences, and correspondence. Students enrolled in the seminar are expected to prepare and present a research paper on one aspect of Newman's spirituality.

TRS 868D: Newman's Theological Writings

3.00 Credits

This doctoral seminar examine Newman's theological principles as presented in his Grammar of Assent, Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine, Letter to the Duke of Norfolk, and Idea of a University. Students enrolled in the seminar are expected to prepare and present a research paper on one aspect of Newman's theology

TRS 868H: La Nouvelle Theologie

3.00 Credits

A study of the theological and ecclesial renewal in France in the mid-1950s. Led by such figures as Henri de Lubac, Jean Daniélou, Henri Bouillard, M.-D. Chenu, Yves Congar, and Hans Urs von Balthasar, it was stigmatized as a "new theology" and was considered to have been censured by Pope Pius XII in the encyclical "Humani generis."

TRS 868I: Modern Augustinianism

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 869A: The Theology of Joseph Ratzinger

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 869B: Theology of Martin Luther

3.00 Credits

A detailed examination of the theology of Martin Luther. Texts will be read from all periods of his writing. Particular attention will be given to ecumenical issues raised by his writings and to Catholic interpretations and responses. While Luther will be placed in his historical context, the primary focus of the seminar will be theological.

TRS 880: Catholic Identity

3.00 Credits

Covers issues relating to the social and cultural sources of Catholic identity; how the boundaries of Catholic identity have been transformed over time; how cohort effect, salience and life-course experience impact Catholic identity; the role of ethnic and multi-cultural dynamics in expressing Catholic identity; Catholic identity as interest group conflict; issues of Catholic identity formation in a postmodern culture of choice.

TRS 880A: Advanced Topics in Religious Studies

3.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 881: Religion and Social Change

3.00 Credits

Examines the role of religion as both a catalyst and an impediment to social change. Topics covered include religiously inspired liberation movements, peace movements; fundamentalism and religious extremism; religious privatization; and dynamics surrounding the cultural commodification of religion.

TRS 881A: Translating God(s): Comparative Theological Seminar

3.00 Credits

Advanced reading and research in Comparative Theology as a new field in historical and systematic theology. Emphasis is given to comparative projects on the Indic, Islamic and Christian theological traditions. Focus varies on topics and motifs such as God(s)/ultimate reality, tradition, revelation, scripture, nature, human condition, gender, sacred life, love, religious truth, etc. The course is required for students taking comparative theology as their Minor Area for the Ph.D. comprehensive examinations in Historical and Systematic Theology. Prerequisites: a course on method in comparative theology and evidence of closer study of one particular world religion.

TRS 882: Spiritual Questing in Modern American Society

3.00 Credits

Thematic and interdisciplinary approach to spiritual questing in the post WWII era. Topics examined include the uncoupling of "spirituality" from "religion"; the relationship between emergent spiritualities and America's therapeutic culture; links between health, happiness and spiritual strategies; the influence of Eastern esoteric philosophies, psychologies and religious traditions on spirituality in America; New Age and "alternative" spiritualities; and issues surrounding the discernment of spiritual authenticity.

TRS 882A: Secularity and Its Discontents

3.00 Credits

Secularity and Its Discontents: An examination of how the recent global resurgence of religion has influenced understandings of secularity, secularism, and secularization. Accounts of post-secularity by such thinkers as Charles Taylor, Juergen Habermas, John Caputo, John Milbank, and Gianni Vattimo will be considered.

TRS 882B: Religion and Globalization

3.00 Credits

This seminar is an interdisciplinary and thematic approach to the topic of religion and globalization. Issues covered include the role of public religion in a post-secular world; theories and patterns of secularization; the rise of religious fundamentalism, Pentecostalism, and militant Islam; the shift in Christianity's center-of-gravity to the developing world; the role of religion in international relations; and the impact of market economy dynamics on global religious behaviors.

TRS 883: Philosophy of Religion Religious Epistemology

3.00 Credits

Philosophers belonging to nearly every religious tradition have offered arguments in support of their traditions' most basic religious doctrines. In this course we will consider, in detail, some of the epistemological frameworks within which these arguments have been (and continue to be) offered. More specifically, we will discuss (1) Reformed Epistemology; (2) Virtue Epistemology; (3) The Epistemology of Religious Experience; (4) Proper Function, (5) Islamic, (6) Hindu, and (7) Jaina Epistemologies.

TRS 891A: Seminar in Zen

3.00 Credits

This seminar will explore the historical development of the tradition that was to become known as Zen Buddhism, making use of critical scholarship, primary texts in translation, and in-class discussion. Students will learn about the origins of the tradition in China, its development in other parts of East Asia, and its dissemination to the west. Jones.

TRS 891B: Comparative Reading of the Qur'an

3.00 Credits

This seminar will concentrate on an interdisciplinary reading of selected chapters from the Qur'an in which the relationship between the "People of the Book" is addressed. The readings will pay attention to both Muslim and non-Muslim traditions of interpretation of the Qur'an, and it will include inter-textual exegesis and comparative theological approaches. While traditional qur'anic exegesis (tafsir) will be one of the major elements of the seminar, knowledge of the Arabic language is not a prerequisite, and the function of qur'anic texts in contemporary dialogues between Muslims and Christians will be explicitly addressed as well.

TRS 893: Directed Research

3.00 Credits

With the permission and consultation of a particular faculty member, the student designs and implements a research project resulting in a research paper of the same scope and quality of a paper produced in a doctoral seminar course.

TRS 996A: Dissertation - STD

0.00 Credits

This course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.

TRS 996B: Dissertation - Doctoral

0.00 Credits

This course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.

TRS 996C: Doctor of Ministry Project Guidance

0.00 Credits

This course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.

TRS 998A: Doctoral Comprehensive Examination (w/Classes)

0.00 Credits

no description available

TRS 998B: Doctoral Comprehensive Examination (w/o Classes)

0.00 Credits

Enrollment in this course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.